One mom asked for donations to fight childhood cancer. 20 years later? $100 million — and counting.
True
Aflac

Kids who have a lot of health issues have a rough time. But when it's cancer … well, it's particularly brutal.

But Ansley Riedel fought childhood cancer and beat it.

She had a particularly difficult form of leukemia to treat beginning at age 1, and she had to fight it for just over two years. For any hope of a cure, she needed a bone marrow transplant — but it could not be done anywhere in her region. Her family had to travel across the country to save her life.


In 1995, her mother, Vicki, was raising funds for Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and asked Aflac CEO Dan Amos for a small donation to make renovations on the floor where they cared for children with cancer, and that's where things began.

20 years later, Aflac has donated $100 million to the fight. That's no small potatoes.

Thanks to medical progress funded in part by donations like that, Ansley survived.

She's now a nurse at Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, where she wants to help other kids get through hard times.

Over 15,000 kids under the age of 20 will be diagnosed with cancer this year.

What does that look like when you glance around the neighborhood or schoolyard?


1 in every 4 elementary schools will have a child attending who has cancer. Wow.

There is good news, though. In the 1960s, childhood cancer had only a 10% survival rate. Now, it's up to 80%. Progress, right?

You're probably thinking, "But aren't there a bunch of dollars every year from the federal government that go to cancer research?" And you'd be right.

Except:

Less than 4% of federal funding for cancer research goes to pediatric cancer. It needs our help.

Childhood cancer research specifically is critically underfunded. Here's some more about these numbers:

So how to help more kids beat cancer like Ansley? Spread the word.

Courtesy of Movemeant Foundation

True

Have you ever woken up one day and wondered if you were destined to do more in your life? Or worried you didn't take that shot at your dream?

FOX's new show "The Big Leap." is here to show you that all you need to take that second chance is the confidence to do so.

Watch as a group of diverse underdogs from all different walks of life try to change their lives by auditioning for a reality TV dance show, finding themselves on an emotional journey when suddenly thrust into the spotlight. And they're not letting the fact that they don't have the traditional dancer body type, age, or background hold them back.

Unfortunately, far too many people lack this kind of confidence. That's why FOX is partnering with the Movemeant Foundation, an organization whose whole mission is to teach women and girls that fitness and physical movement is essential to helping them develop self-confidence, resilience, and commitment with communities of like-minded girls.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Tod Perry

The first few months after having a newborn are seriously stressful. It's tough to get any sleep and your entire schedule revolves around the needs of the baby.

It's expensive, too! It seems like you're constantly shelling out $25 for a box of diapers and $40 for a can of formula.

So it's understandable that a Facebook user who goes by the name of Chris Blaze asked for a deal when buying a Samsung washer and dryer set of a guy named Dave he met online.

Keep Reading Show less