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OMG. Google 'Tucker Carlson' And 'Gay Marriage.'

"History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people." ~Martin Luther King Jr.The Huffington Post identified the 10 Democratic senators who have yet to publicly support gay marriage. What are they waiting for? A majority of Americans support it; yes, even Tucker Carlson supports it.Our efforts are paying off. Only 3 remain! Please take a second to TWEET, EMAIL or CALL a few of these senators and ask them to publicly support marriage equality. Yes, you can even thank Tucker!

OMG. Google 'Tucker Carlson' And 'Gay Marriage.'
1. Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 4/1/13!

Sen. Casey said the letters & stories he received impacted his decision.


Tweet a "thanks" to Sen. Casey!

Email Sen. Casey
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-6324




2. Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.)

Opposes same-sex marriage and backs DOMA.

Oh boy. Baby steps, folks. Organizing 101: Share Your Story -- tell Joe what gay marriage would mean to you.

Email Sen. Manchin
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-3954


3. Sen. Kay Hagan (D-N.C.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 3/27/13!

She has a tough re-election in '14. You can email, call, or Tweet her to say "thanks," and let her know we'll have her back.

Email Sen. Hagan
Call her D.C. office: (202) 224-6342




4. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Fla.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 4/4/13!

Way to go, Bill! Tweet Sen. Nelson to say "thanks!"

Email Sen. Nelson
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-5274




5. Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 4/5/13!

Give Heidi a big "HOO-AH!" and tweet her a "thanks!"

Email Sen. Heitkamp
Call her D.C. office: (202) 224-2043




6. Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.)

"People should be allowed to love who they love."

Tough state -- it has a constitutional ban against same-sex marriage, AND she's up for re-election in '14. So, be gentle but firm. We need Mary to lead from her great big heart. 

Email Sen. Landrieu
Call her D.C. office: (202) 224-5824




7. Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 4/2/13!

Right on, Tom! Tweet a big "thanks" to Sen. Carper!

Email Sen. Carper
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-2441




8. Sen. Tim Johnson (D-S.D.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 4/8/13!

Make sure you tweet a "thanks" to Sen. Johnson!

Email Sen. Johnson
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-5842




9. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.)

UPDATE: Supports same-sex marriage as of 4/5/13!

Right on, Joe! Courage of conviction, man. Tweet Sen. Donnelly a "thanks!"

Email Sen. Donnelly
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-4814




10. Sen. Mark Pryor (D-Ark.)

Does not support same-sex marriage.

Look, it's Arkansas, people; I can't do anything about that. We gotta start somewhere. Be nice: Share your personal story about what equality marriage means to you. Kill 'em with kindness.

Email Sen. Pryor
Call his D.C. office: (202) 224-2353




BONUS: Tucker Carlson ("libertarian")

Supports gay marriage.

So, we agree with Tucker Carlson! There's a first time for everything. Swallow your pride. Reward tolerance. Tweet Tucker a quick thanks:

On July 24, 2007, Carlson said on his show, "I'm just for marriage generally. I'm for people making a lifelong commitment. Do you know what I mean? I'm not against gay marriage, actually, and I'm the most right-wing person I know." Carlson later went on to say, "I think, marriage has been a great thing for me, and I think it's a really civilizing force, and I think it would be a civilizing force for gay people, too."


























True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

Photo by Adelin Preda on Unsplash

A multinational study found that bystanders intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The recent news report of a woman on a Philadelphia train being raped while onlookers did nothing to stop it was shocking and horrible, without question. It also got people discussing the infamous "bystander effect," which has led people to believe—somewhat erroneously, as it turns out—that people aren't likely to intervene when they see someone being attacked in public. Stories like this uninterrupted train assault combined with a belief that bystanders rarely step in can easily lead people to feel like everything and everyone is horrible.

But according to the most recent research on the subject, the Philadelphia incident appears to be the exception, not the rule. A 2019 multinational study found that at least one bystander (but usually more) will actually intervene in 9 out of 10 public conflicts.

The idea that people in groups aren't likely to intervene stems largely from research on the 1964 story of Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment in New York, while dozens of onlookers in surrounding apartment buildings allegedly did nothing. However, further research has called the number of witnesses into question, and it appears that several did, in fact, call the police. Someone reportedly shouted out their window and scared the attacker away for a few minutes, and someone did rush to Genovese's aid after the second attack.

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