+
More

Olympian Gus Kenworthy shared some of his worst hate mail and made a powerful point.

Homophobia is very, very real.

If you've ever wondered why gay people keep "shoving their sexuality down your throat" (which sounds a bit, uh, sexual in itself?), Olympian Gus Kenworthy has a tweet you might want to see.

Kenworthy, a skiier, is fresh off the games in Pyeongchang, where he and figure skating sensation Adam Rippon made history as some of the first openly gay members of Team USA's Olympic squad (Kenworthy won a silver medal during the 2014 Sochi games, but wasn't out as gay just yet).

Like a lot of Olympic athletes, Kenworthy posted a lot of photos to his social media accounts during his downtime — and yes, some mentioned that he was happy he could represent America as himself.  It was pretty sweet!


As one might expect, this led some people to ask him to tone it down, often employing the classic "nobody cares if you're gay" reason.

"There's really no need to ram it down everyone's throat at every opportunity," wrote one person on Twitter. Interestingly, none of the accounts chiding him for posting a photo with his boyfriend or cheering on Rippon had sent similar "nobody cares if you're straight" tweets to straight athletes posting about their significant others or family. It's almost if people do care that he's gay.

Images via Twitter.

On Feb. 27, he decided to share a few comments from his YouTube page that kind of put an end to the "homophobia doesn't exist anymore" narrative.

"Gross faggot. Fuck you. Go die of AIDS. Sodom and Gomorrah will return. Sick nasty pedo-fag," wrote a user going by the name of Robert Miller. "Gus you are nothing but a sperm drinking, ass fucking FAG — a fucking FREAK of nature, hurry and get AIDS," wrote a user going by Floyd Schott. Yikes!

Lest you think these were just isolated comments, a quick glance at his Twitter mentions proves otherwise.

Kenworthy earned the ire of a small legion of Donald Trump supporters when he tweeted a few jokes aimed at the administration:

"So proud of all these people!" he tweeted, sharing a photo of Team USA. "Everybody here has worked so hard to make it to the Olympics and have the opportunity to walk in the closing ceremony! Well ... Everyone except Ivanka. Honestly, tf is she doing here??"

After the Olympic Athletes from Russia took home the gold medal in men's hockey, he tweeted, "Russia's biggest win since the 2016 US Presidential election!"

When he broke his thumb practicing, he joked that it'd prevent him from shaking Mike Pence's hand, and that was a silver lining.

Some Trump supporters were upset by those comments, even though they were pretty tame. Several responded with anti-gay slurs. A closer look shows that the slurs — many of which called him mentally ill, wished death on him, hoped he would get AIDS, etc. — began long before he ever uttered a word about the administration.

Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images. Images via Twitter.

Still, it did spark a lot of outrage among Trump's supporters, and resulted in some unintentionally hilarious tweets. For example, one Twitter user came to the defense of the president's LGBTQ bonafides by saying Trump had the "most fag friendly policies from a president to ever enter the White House."

First of all, no, Donald Trump is not LGBTQ-friendly by any stretch of the imagination. His administration has argued that it should be legal to fire someone for being gay, he fired the entire White House HIV/AIDS council, and he's still in the process of trying to kick trans people out of the military. He is objectively bad on LGBTQ issues, and you can hardly blame Kenworthy or anyone else for being a little salty about it.

Image via Twitter.

Beyond that, though, the comment really highlights the lengths people will go to convince themselves that homophobia is a thing of the past, and that LGBTQ people are the oppressors forcing their views on others. The truth is, as long as being able to live one's life, to post a photo on social media kissing your boyfriend, or even just to mention that you're gay, or bi, or trans without getting a boatload of hate in response, the "Nobody cares if you're gay" comments are just flat-out wrong.

It would be great if "nobody cared" about someone else's sexual orientation or gender identity, but the truth is that these issues still matter a whole lot. It took until 2018 that a U.S. Olympic athlete felt safe and comfortable enough to be open about who they are. That is worth celebrating, and people do care. Because they care, it's important that people like Kenworthy continue to stand up and make themselves heard.

Family

Two couples move in together with their kids to create one big, loving 'polyfamory'

They are using their unique family arrangement to help people better understand polyamory.

The Hartless and Rodgers families post together


Polyamory, a lifestyle where people have multiple romantic or sexual partners, is more prevalent in America than most people think. According to a study published in Frontiers in Psychology, one in nine Americans have been in a polyamorous relationship, and one in six say they would like to try one.

However popular the idea is, polyamory is misunderstood by a large swath of the public and is often seen as deviant. However, those who practice it view polyamory as a healthy lifestyle with several benefits.

Taya Hartless, 28, and Alysia Rogers, 34, along with their husbands Sean, 46, and Tyler, 35, are in a polyamorous relationship and have no problem sharing their lifestyle with the public on social media. Even though they risk stigmatization for being open about their non-traditional relationships, they are sharing it with the world to make it a safer place for “poly” folks like themselves.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Touching video shows a new father joyfully singing while cradling his baby in the NICU

Seeing the baby raise his little hand moved the father to tears.

@fritojohnson89/TikTok

Little Remington listening to his father sing.

An incredible moment captured between a father and his newborn son has brought viewers to tears.

The viral video shows Daniel Johnson singing the worship song “Hallelujah Here Below” by Elevation Worship as he cradles his preemie son, Remington Hayze, in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

Miraculously, as soon as Johnson begins singing a chorus of “hallelujahs,” Remington’s tiny hand raises as though he were carried away by the music. Seeing this, Johnson is instantly overcome with emotion and can’t finish the song.

Keep ReadingShow less
All illustrations are provided by Soosh and used with permission.

I have plenty of space.

This article originally appeared on 04.09.16


It's hard to truly describe the amazing bond between dads and their daughters.

Being a dad is an amazing job no matter the gender of the tiny humans we're raising. But there's something unique about the bond between fathers and daughters.

Most dads know what it's like to struggle with braiding hair, but we also know that bonding time provides immense value to our daughters. In fact, studies have shown that women with actively involved fathers are more confident and more successful in school and business.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Professional tidier Marie Kondo says she's 'kind of given up' after having three kids

Hearing Kondo say, 'My home is messy,' is sparking joy for moms everywhere.

Marie Kondo playing with her daughters.

Marie Kondo's book, "The Life-Changing Art of Tidying Up," has repeatedly made huge waves around the world since it came out in 2010. From eliminating anything that didn't "spark joy" from your house to folding clothes into tiny rectangles and storing them vertically, the KonMari method of maintaining an organized home hit the mark for millions of people. The success of her book even led to two Netflix series.

It also sparked backlash from parents who insisted that keeping a tidy home with children was not so simple. It's one thing to get rid of an old sweater that no longer brings you joy. It's entirely another to toss an old, empty cereal box that sparks zero joy for you, but that your 2-year-old is inexplicably attached to.

To be fair, Kondo never forced her way into anyone's home and made them organize it her way. But also to be fair, she didn't have kids when she wrote her best-selling book on keeping a tidy home. The reality is that keeping a home organized and tidy with children living in it is a whole other ballgame, as Kondo has discovered now that she has three kids of her own.

Keep ReadingShow less
Family

Actress Julia Fox shares a tour of her cluttered NYC apartment, and it's a relatable mess

"Hopefully, somebody watches this and thinks, ‘Well, OK, maybe I’m not doing so bad.’”

@juliafox/TikTok

Julia Fox taking viewers on a tour of her apartment in New York.

To live in a perfectly curated, always tidy, Marie Kondo-worthy home might be a lovely fantasy. But for many, dare I say most of us, that is simply not a reality. There just aren’t enough hours in the day or helpful hands in the house to keep it from getting messy multiple times a week. Square that by a million if the home has small kiddos in it. And if there’s only one parent to clean up after those small kiddos? Forget about it.

That’s why people are letting out a huge sigh of relief after getting a video tour of Julia Fox’s New York apartment in all its glorious disarray.

The actress and model is often seen wearing bold, high-end fashion pieces at glamorous events like the Met Gala,

but her home is anything but glamorous.

Keep ReadingShow less
Identity

This blind chef wore a body cam to show how she prepares dazzling dishes.

How do blind people cook? This "Masterchef" winner leans into her senses.

Image pulled from YouTube video.

Christine Ha competes on "Masterchef."

This article originally appeared on 05.26.17


There is one question chef Christine Ha fields more than any other.

But it's got nothing to do with being a "Masterchef" champion, New York Times bestselling author, and acclaimed TV host and cooking instructor.

The question: "How do you cook while blind?"

Keep ReadingShow less