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Not Many People Are Talking About Amy Adams' Golden Globes Speech, But It Deserves To Be Seen Again

Usually when an actor wins a prestigious award, about halfway through they start grudgingly thanking their competition. Cut to half-hearted applause and grimacing by a losing actor and repeat until done. Amy Adams doesn't do that because she doesn't consider other awesome women getting big-time roles competition at all. The good part starts about a minute in.

Not Many People Are Talking About Amy Adams' Golden Globes Speech, But It Deserves To Be Seen Again


So yeah, this is 100% on point. What's important is not that one woman won one award but that we're seeing more baller women in more interesting, more prominent roles in more TV and movies. So that people like Amy's 4-year-old daughter grow up seeing themselves represented as real, complex people, not just as somebody's wife or girlfriend or object of desire.

And women really are killing it right now. Let's run down the list, starting with just the people in the room.


Helen Mirren

in "The Hundred-Foot Journey."

Francis McDormand and Julia Louis Dreyfus

in "Olive Kitteridge" and "Veep."

Meryl Streep

in "Into The Woods" and — COME ON IT'S MERYL STREEP, 'NOUGH SAID PEOPLE.

And let's not forget...

Maggie Gyllenhaal

in "The Honourable Woman," who even spoke to the issue last night in her own acceptance speech.

And then there's...

Taylor Schilling

in "Orange Is the New Black."

Julianna Margulies

in "The Good Wife."

Edie Falco

in "Nurse Jackie."

And that's before we get to all the incredible women of color dominating TV right now.

Gina Rodriguez

in "Jane the Virgin."

And then of course...

Viola Davis

in "How to Get Away with Murder."

Kerry Washington

in "Scandal."

Nicole Beharie

in "Sleepy Hollow."

Tracee Ellis Ross

in "Blackish."

Women are still very underrepresented in the entertainment industry, especially in positions of power and influence, and many would argue that more visibility isn't enough to make real change happen. Still, it's hard to deny that a real shift is taking place.

What do you think? Let us know @Upworthy!

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Via Pexels and Sean MacEntee / Flickr

Apple has taken a huge step towards protecting children by announcing its new plan to scan iPhone photos for images of child abuse. The company will use a "neural match" system to scan photographs and if anything looks suspicious, a human at Apple will be notified to review the images and contact the authorities if necessary.

According to Apple, the new system will "continuously scan photos that are stored on a US user's iPhone and have also been uploaded to its iCloud back-up system."

The system is designed to protect users' privacy by scanning photos without making private communications readable by the company.

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