No more excuses, fellas. Two single dads will show you how to do your daughters' 'do.
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Dads can do it all.

Most of us prepare healthy meals without the use of a microwave, host epic playdates, and wake up in the middle of the night to handle any monsters silly enough to hide under our kids' beds.

We're also amazing at styling our daughters' hair. Fish tails, princess braids, fancy buns, whatever. You name the 'do, and we got you.


Um, I lost you with that last one, didn't I?

Props given to the dads skilled enough to style hair for their little girls, but there are a lot of men (myself included) who could use a little help in that department.

Sure, we could just use this technique if we were in a pinch.

GIF via janbak1984/YouTube.

But for those pesky moments when a vacuum isn't readily available, it would make sense for dudes to learn about female hair care in the traditional sense.

Enter these two single dads who want to change the daddy-daughter hair game forever.

Photo courtesy Greg Wickherst (left) and Phil Morgese (right).

First up is Phil Morgese, a single dad from Florida who works in sales.

Morgese with his daughter Emma. Photo courtesy of Phil Morgese.

He has a 9-year-old daughter named Emma, and quite frankly, the man is an absolute hair ace.

This is the work of a master. Photo courtesy of Phil Morgese.

And he was self-taught, too.

"If you practice something daily, you have no choice but to become better at it," he told Upworthy. "I didn't have anyone in my social circle who was active with hair like me, so I just figured it out as I went."

Morgese's story goes beyond caring for his own daughter.

He recently started a class to help other dads in his town who are struggling to make sense of braids and bangs.

And the class absolutely blew up in popularity.

It's standing room only for the dads doin' the do. Photo courtesy of Phil Morgese.

After some practice, his students were able to create a few amazing styles for their daughters, while enjoying some invaluable bonding time in the process.

The focused eyes prove that these men are taking this class very seriously. Photo courtesy of Phil Morgese.

And when the classes are over, you won't find a happier (and more stylish) group of young ladies anywhere.

"Daddy did my hair and it looks awesome!" Photo courtesy of Phil Morgese.

But what about the dads who live outside of Morgese's town in Florida? He encourages men to visit his Daddy Daughter Hair Factory Facebook page, where he hopes dads will feel comfortable to ask questions, seek support, and receive advice. He's also in the process of creating an online course so he can pass on his learnings virtually.

The best part about all of this? His classes are completely free.

"If I charged for the class, it would be viewed as a business instead of a service to the community," he said. "I want to serve the community and do my small part to make the world a better place."

Morgese started hearing from dads all over the country who loved doing hair, like Greg Wickherst, an admissions representative at a technical college in Colorado.

Wickherst and his adorable 3-year-old daughter Izzy. Photo courtesy of Greg Wickherst.

When Wickherst became frustrated over his inability to style his 3-year-old daughter Izzy's hair, he decided to take action by asking the cosmetology students at his school for a few pointers.

Keep in mind, this is a guy who has shaved his head for the majority of his adult life and is first to admit that handling his daughter's hair was his biggest weakness as a parent. But he stuck with it for the sake of his little girl.

At first it was simple ponytails, braids, and buns. Shortly thereafter, he could create almost anything for Izzy.

Like this.

I had no idea that hair could even look this good. Photo courtesy of Greg Wickherst.

And this.

Another beautiful 'do. Photo courtesy of Greg Wickherst.

And, whoa...

The birdcage. No big deal — just the work of an expert stylist, that's all. Photo courtesy of Greg Wickherst.

Wickherst wants to use his newfound expertise to help other dads (and moms) who are apprehensive about getting in the hair game. He's in the process of writing a book called "A Dad's Guide to Surviving Hair" and he operates a Facebook page where he shares styling tips and photos of his favorite hairdos.

These two dads just had to meet in person, right?

That's exactly what happened. Wickherst and Morgese became fast friends via phone and met up in Florida recently with their daughters.

And you guessed it: Their little girls hit it off, too.

Izzy and Emma enjoying some quiet time together. Photo courtesy of Greg Wickherst and Phil Morgese.

Morgese and Wickherst are doing amazing things to help fathers all over the world, but they'll also be the first to tell you they aren't heroes. Except for in the minds of their young daughters.

Here's how Morgese describes his motivation:

"It's our job as dads to be supportive in all aspect of our daughters' lives. It takes a strong and secure man to join my class because he's willing to address a shortcoming for the sake of his children. Don't let traditional male stereotypes or haters get in your way. Men can do hair, too."

Word.

Now let's get back to using vacuum cleaners for what they're intended for. Namely, picking up the endless trail of glitter, graham cracker crumbs, and broken Legos.


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