Money, war, and climate. It's why some people are coming to a country near you.

Here's why global migration is on the rise.

Moving isn't fun. Honestly, it sucks. Squeezing your life into a handful of boxes can be trying for even the most organized person. But imagine if you were forced to move.

Like right now. No notice. No calling the homies to help pack up. No farewell bash. What if you were just pushed out of your house, your neighborhood, your city, your state, and your country? Then what?


Well, that happens to lots of people all of the time while we're calmly sipping on our lattes. Why?

According to a recent report from AJ+, at least 232 million people globally live in nations where they weren't born in or aren't citizens of. Host Dena Takruri breaks down why folks are leaving their homes. There are three main reasons.

Because it's scary out there — yo!

The ongoing presence of war and persecution is the main factor. It's done more than physical damage. It's really emotional too. People have to leave everything and sometimes everyone they know in the name of safety. Right now, the largest refugee communities are from Syria, Afghanistan, and Somalia. Smaller nations like Pakistan, Kenya, and Lebanon are taking these folks in. Dena says that in Lebanon almost 1 in 5 people is a Syrian refugee and that their "infrastructure and economy have been pushed to the breaking point." Wow.


Although larger nations have only taken in 14% of the world's refugees, they do have better-paying jobs.

The lack of economic resources is another reason why people escape their homelands legally or illegally. When a country like the U.S. has jobs that offer six times the pay in your country, potentially risking your life to feed your starving family may feel like the only option. Oftentimes these economic opportunities aren't the ones that everyone wants. Lots of migrants work heinous hours and make way below minimum wage. And that's not just in the U.S. "In the United Arab Emirates, Indians, Bangladeshis and Pakistanis make up 90% of the work force, despite poor working conditions, unfair treatment and low wages," Dena explains.

If you're lucky enough to side step war or a busted economy, you're favored if you don't have to leave your country because of the environment.

Natural disasters have displaced thousands upon thousands. Climate change is also very real and affecting people in a major way. “In Tuvalu, a tiny island nation in the South Pacific, rising sea levels are forcing people to move to nearby countries like New Zealand," Dena adds.

So, sure, moving voluntarily can irk, but it doesn't compare to the serious pain of having to uproot your life due to mostly uncontrollable factors. I wonder what would happen if we all thought about these things before judging someone else's perceived right to live on the same soil.

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