Meet the 16-year-old fashion designer whose sustainable looks may shake up the industry.

Using mosquito netting, branches, ribbon, and flowers, 16-year-old Apichet "Madaew" Atilattana is turning the fashion industry on its head.

Madaew looks for materials. Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.


The high school student from Khon Kaen, Thailand, creates innovative designs using unconventional materials, and he's garnered quite the following.

Madaew is often inspired by plants, animals, and other organic elements.

Madaew models a skirt he made from morning glory, a plant he bought at a local market. Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

He captures the natural beauty in everyday objects like morning glory, ribbon, branches, un-tailored fabric, and even mosquito netting.


Madaew prepares bamboo baskets for one of his designs. Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

Part artist, part botanist, and part engineer, Madaew designs, crafts, and models each piece himself.

Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

Of course, he does get help from a few family members, who are eager to lend a hand...

Madaew's grandmother helps out as he creates a top made from branches and ribbon. Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

...and take photos.

This design was inspired by butterflies. Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

Since Madaew doesn't have a computer, he edits the photos on his phone.

Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

In February, Madaew started posting his work on social media.

He now boasts more than 185,000 fans and followers across Facebook and Instagram.

A photo posted by thai ban fashionist (@daewzii2542) on

Madaew is proof that with imagination and passion, there are no limits to what we can do.

While you won't find the 16-year-old on the runway at New York Fashion Week with jaw-dropping designs like these, it's only a matter of time.


Madaew's father prepares to photograph a larger-than-life look the teen crafted out of mosquito netting. Photo by Taylor Weidman/Getty Images.

Gorgeous! Slay, Madaew!

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