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Lady Gaga perfectly calls out the 'ignorance' driving Trump’s new attack on gender laws.

Earlier this week, the Trump Administration announced plans to narrowly define gender. The announcement sent shock waves across the country.

After so much progress in recent years for transgender and non-binary people, this was an unscientific and insulting setback that seems squarely rooted in scoring cruel, political points rather than in any cohesive policies or principles.

Enter Lady Gaga.

Still glowing from her breakout performance in “A Star is Born,” the singer/actress has become a reliably admirable voice on social issues. Gaga is a uniter not a divider, but she’s not afraid to call out people like President Trump when they are doing the dividing.


Using her Twitter account, Gaga sent a message of hope and a rhetorical call to arms, writing:

"The government may be living in an alternate universe, but we as a society & culture know who we are and know our truth and must stick together and raise our voices so we can educate them about gender identities.”

"While today you might feel unheard or unseen, know that this is not the reality of humanity. This is another display of leadership being driven by ignorance."

It's easy to feel hopeless in the face of a continued assault on the rights and dignity of marginalized people. But we can stand up to, and put a stop to, inequality when we speak out.

Lady Gaga is using her powerful voice to give strength to those our government would unjustly harm. But we can all make a difference by transforming that voice into a chorus that's impossible for the world to ignore.

This could be the guest house.


Inequality has gotten worse than you think.

An investigation by former "Daily Show" correspondent Hasan Minhaj is still perfectly apt and shows that the problem isn't just your classic case of "the rich get richer and the poor get poorer."

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Kevin Parry / Twitter

Toronto-based animator and video wizard Kevin Parry has gone mega-viral for his mind-boggling collection of videos where he turns himself into random objects.

In a series of quick clips he changes into everything from a pumpkin to a bright yellow banana and in most of the videos, he appears to suffer a ridiculous death. The videos combine studio trickery with a magician's flair.

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Pop Culture

A brave fan asks Patrick Stewart a question he doesn't usually get and is given a beautiful answer

Patrick Stewart often talks about his childhood and the torment his father put him and his mother through.

Patrick Stewart often talks about his childhood and the torment his father put him and his mother through. However, how he answered this vulnerable and brave fan's question is one of the most eloquent, passionate responses about domestic violence I've ever seen.

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A map of the United States post land-ice melt.


Land ice: We got a lot of it.

Considering the two largest ice sheets on earth — the one on Antarctica and the one on Greenland — extend more than 6 million square miles combined ... yeah, we're talkin' a lot of ice.

But what if it was all just ... gone? Not like gone gone, but melted?

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OriginalAll photos belong to Red Méthot, who gave me permission to share them here.

Chloé was born at 32 weeks.


Every single day, babies across the world are born prematurely, which means that they're born before 37 weeks of gestation.

In Canada, about 29,000 infants are born prematurely each year, roughly 1 in every 13. But in the United States, around 400,000 to 500,000 are born early. That's about 1 in every 8 to 10 babies born in the U.S.!

Red Méthot, a Canadian photographer and student, decided to capture the resilience of many of these kids for a school photography project.

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Democracy

Teacher tries to simulate a dictatorship in her classroom, but the students crushed her

"I’ve done this experiment numerous times, and each year I have similar results. This year, however, was different."

Each year that I teach the book "1984" I turn my classroom into a totalitarian regime under the guise of the "common good."

I run a simulation in which I become a dictator. I tell my students that in order to battle "Senioritis," the teachers and admin have adapted an evidence-based strategy, a strategy that has "been implemented in many schools throughout the country and has had immense success." I hang posters with motivational quotes and falsified statistics, and provide a false narrative for the problem that is "Senioritis."

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