Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard just destroyed one of the biggest myths about sobriety.
Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Dax Shepard is sober. Kristen Bell is not. And he couldn’t be more supportive of that.

For many people who struggle with substance abuse issues there is an inherent fear that once they stop using they will no longer be able to be around their friends who aren't sober.

And sometimes that fear is mutual, with friends and family worrying that they have to hide their continued normal use around their sober loved ones, or else they could send them into a spiral of relapse.


But in a new interview, Bell showed it doesn't have to be that way when couples are able to honestly and lovingly communicate with each other.

In August, Shepard celebrated 14 years of sobriety. It’s a major accomplishment and Bell was right there in full public support of her husband, sharing a loving note on Instagram in which she praised the fellow actor’s commitment to his healthy lifestyle and overcoming his past struggles with addiction.

But in a new interview, Bell revealed that she regularly vapes marijuana around Shepard -- and he couldn’t care less.

"I smoke around my husband and it doesn't seem to bother him," Bell told WTF host Marc Maron during an appearance on his podcast, adding, “Weed rules.”

Bell made it clear she’s not achieving Snoop Dogg levels of cannabis cultivation here.

"Once a week, if I am exhausted and we are about to sit down and watch 60 Minutes, why not?" she told Maron.

Maron, who is himself sober, was surprised Shepard was so comfortable with his wife enjoying a mind-altering substance in his presence.

But as Bell wisely pointed out, people who have faced their own substance issues -- either through a 12-Step recovery program or others means -- can often co-exist with their non-sober friends or partners just fine.

People don't have to stay in crisis forever and sober people are perfectly capable of having fun around non-sober people.

"He lost his privilege with [drugs] because he can't handle it; his brain doesn't have the chemistry to handle it," Bell said.

View this post on Instagram

To the man mocked me in our wedding photos because I cried too many tears of joy, Who wore a baby Bjorn for 2 straight years to show his girls how to be as adventurous as possible, Who held our dear little shakey mann pup for 8 hrs straight on the day we had to put him down, I know how much you loved using. I know how much it got in your way. And I know, because I saw, how hard you worked to live without it. I will forever be in awe of your dedication, and the level of fierce moral inventory you perform on yourself, like an emotional surgery, every single night. You never fail to make amends, or say sorry when its needed. You are always available to guide me, and all of our friends, with open ears and tough love when its needed most. You have become the fertilizer in the garden of our life, encouraging everyone to grow. I'm so proud that you have never been ashamed of your story, but instead shared it widely, with the hope it might inspire someone else to become the best version of themselves. You have certainly inspired me to do so. I love you more than I ever thought I could love anyone, and I want you to know, I see you. I see how hard you work. You set an excellent example of being human. Happy 14th year sobriety birthday, @daxshepard. Xoxo

A post shared by kristen bell (@kristenanniebell) on

In fact, Shepard isn’t just “fine” with his wife vaping from time to time, he wants her to experiment with more drugs, albeit in a safe manner.

Shepard has reportedly suggested that Bell throw an “ecstasy party” at their home, even offering to be a “sober guide” for her and her friends.  

"You shouldn't leave earth without having tried mushrooms or ecstasy," she said Shepard told her.

Hallucinogenic substances like "magic mushrooms" (Psilocybin fungi) and ecstasy (MDMA) have been gaining popularity in mental health circles with growing evidence that they can be used to help treat the symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety and other conditions.

Still, that doesn’t mean Bell plans to tear it up on a regular basis, adding that one thing she certainly agrees with Shepard on is that people who drink too much can be a bit of an eye sore.

"I am not sober and I would agree, it's just annoying," she said.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

Keep Reading Show less

In the autumn of 1939, Chiune Sugihara was sent to Lithuania to open the first Japanese consulate there. His job was to keep tabs on and gather information about Japan's ally, Germany. Meanwhile, in neighboring Poland, Nazi tanks had already begun to roll in, causing Jewish refugees to flee into the small country.

When the Soviet Union invaded Lithuania in June of 1940, scores of Jews flooded the Japanese consulate, seeking transit visas to be able to escape to a safety through Japan. Overwhelmed by the requests, Sugihara reached out to the foreign ministry in Tokyo for guidance and was told that no one without proper paperwork should be issued a visa—a limitation that would have ruled out nearly all of the refugees seeking his help.

Sugihara faced a life-changing choice. He could obey the government and leave the Jews in Lithuania to their fate, or he could disobey orders and face disgrace and the loss of his job, if not more severe punishments from his superiors.

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Sugihara was fond of saying, "I may have to disobey my government, but if I don't, I would be disobeying God." Sugihara decided it was worth it to risk his livelihood and good standing with the Japanese government to give the Jews at his doorstep a fighting chance, so he started issuing Japanese transit visas to any refugee who needed one, regardless of their eligibility.

Keep Reading Show less
True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.

Keep Reading Show less
True
Gates Foundation

Once upon a time, a scientist named Dr. Andrew Wakefield published in the medical journal The Lancet that he had discovered a link between autism and vaccines.

After years of controversy and making parents mistrust vaccines, along with collecting $674,000 from lawyers who would benefit from suing vaccine makers, it was discovered he had made the whole thing up. The Lancet publicly apologized and reported that further investigation led to the discovery that he had fabricated everything.

Keep Reading Show less
via Jess Martini / Tik Tok

There are few things as frightening to a parent than losing your child in a crowded place like a shopping mall, zoo, or stadium. The moment you realize your child is missing, it's impossible not to consider the terrifying idea they may have been kidnapped.

A woman in New Zealand recently lost her son in a Kmart but was able to locate him because of a potentially life-saving parenting hack she saw on TikTok a few months ago.

The woman was shopping at the retailer when she realized her two-year-old son Nathan was missing. She immediately told a friend to alert the staff to ensure he didn't leave through the store's front exit.

Keep Reading Show less