Kids drew us their favorite things in the world, and their pictures are fantastic.

Butterflies, family, and painting on canvas: These are a few of their favorite things.

What's your favorite thing in the world? Quick, say it out loud.

Now think back — would you have given the same answer when you were a teenager? A little kid? Probably not, right?

Let's be real: The grown-up world can be pretty complicated. In the rush and stress of life, it can be hard to remember what matters most and what always makes us happy. It was easier to figure that stuff out when we were kids.


That's why we asked our Upworthy fans on Facebook to give their kids a little homework last week: to draw their favorite thing in the world.

We were thrilled with the responses. So much so that we're sharing them right here, right now:

1. Angela, age 7, loves her cat Sassy Pants.

2. 8-year-old Brooke loves art in all its forms.

3. Carly, age 8, adores her family, including their two adorable dogs.

4. 6-year-old Claire couldn't pick one favorite animal from these three — and neither could we!

5. Connor, age 4, knows that home is where his heart is.

6. Damien's mom tells us that this 3-year-old loves Metallica — especially their band logo.

7. 4-year-old Ella loves her best friend Rexy. So do we.

8. 5-year-old Eliza loves her family more than anything.

9. 8-year-old Ethan is very particular about his favorite ice cream. Wouldn't you be?

10. Gabriel, age 6, says his mom is his favorite thing in the world.

11. 5-year-old Hawthorne picked the original Fab Four, The Beatles, as her favorite thing.

12. Isabella is 6 years old and loves painting more than anything else.

13. 14-year-old Jasmine's favorite thing is her "artistic talent."

Jasmine's mom tells us that her daughter hopes to become a tattoo artist one day, so save some skin space, fans!

14. Jasper is 5 and says his mom is his favorite of all.

15. 6-year-old Jessica picks butterflies as her favorite thing in the world.

The little "I love you Daddy" in the top right corner of the illustration is giving us ALL THE FEELS.

16. 7-year-old Kyle thinks his mom and dad are hearts and stars above the rest.

17. Laiba is 11 and loves drawing "Hunger Games" hero Katniss Everdeen most of all.

18. Marley is 10 and says gymnastics make her jump for joy.

19. 5-year-old Melody's tribute to her favorite thing is making us hungry.

20. 3-year-old Pearl is very particular about her favorite things: a glass of Coke with a straw and a bowl of popcorn.

21. 8-year-old Quinn picks football as his favorite.

Don't get competitive Denver Broncos and Green Bay Packers fans! Quinn has you both with the same score.

22. 5-year-old RJ says Lego is the best of all.

23. Ryker is 6 and loves holidays — like Easter — more than anything else.

24. 11-year-old Sara says both of her pets are #1.

From left to right: Bobo and Dobby.

25. Sara is 7 and a proud member of the ice cream-loving crew.

26. 8-year-old Simone couldn't "B" more excited about her three favorites: bees, butterflies, and bedtime.

27. 5-year-old Stella is on a first-name basis with her favorite person: her mom.

28. Tevye is 8 and loves art more than anything else in the world.

Thanks so much to all our Facebook fans who participated in this little experiment! Let's do it again sometime.

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