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It’s meant as a compliment, but what it really says is, ‘You don't fit in.’

When teens talk, something meant to be a compliment can painfully remind someone else that they're different.

Microaggression is a form of "unintended discrimination."

It's a seemingly friendly comment that unintentionally reveals a nasty — and often painful — underlying prejudice.

Sometimes people are just clueless.

When someone tells you you're better in some way than others of your kind, what they're really saying is that there's usually something wrong with people like you.


Sometimes they're hiding their own feelings from themselves.

The person talking may be trying so hard to show how unconcerned she or he is about someone's color or background that they end up revealing the opposite, just by the simple fact they are dwelling on it.

It's painful to hear.

Speaking up about a microaggression can require bravery.

Because a microaggression can be subtle, the person hearing it may not feel like they have a right to be offended and feel uncomfortable bringing it up.

And when a victim of microagression speaks up, they may be made fun of.

The person who made the comment may not realize what they've done, so they may deny that there's anything wrong with what they've said. This leaves the victim with no way to resolve the hurt feelings and sometimes even wondering if the problem is their own — a toxic situation.

But microaggressions can have a powerful impact, especially on teens.

Because they can be hard pin down, microaggressions may be even worse than more obvious prejudice. They can worm their way into a teen's soul and lodge there, building up over time and doing some real damage. Microaggressions have been associated with anxiety and binge-drinking.

They can get right to the core of a kid.

We have to speak more thoughtfully.

It's as much about what our words might mean to the person we're talking to as it is about what we want to say.

If you have kids, talk to them about microaggression, and feel free to share this with other parents.

The young women in this video will tell you all about it.

Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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This article originally appeared on 06.30.16


When San Francisco photographer Lisa Robinson was about to have her second child, she was both excited and nervous.

Sure, those are the feelings most moms-to-be experience before giving birth, but Lisa's nerves were tied to something different.

Photo by Ian Waldie/Getty Images.

She and her husband already had a 9-year-old son but desperately wanted another baby. They spent years trying to get pregnant again, but after countless failed attempts and two miscarriages, they decided to stop trying.

Of course, that's when Lisa ended up becoming pregnant with her daughter, Anora. Since it was such a miraculous pregnancy, Lisa wanted to do something special to commemorate her daughter's birth.

So she turned to her craft — photography — as a way to both commemorate the special day, and keep herself calm and focused throughout the birthing process.

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Baby Cora bears a striking resemblance to actor Woody Harrelson.

We can all get a little fascinated by doppelgängers and it's fun to find people who look alike. But what do you do when your baby girl looks uncannily like a famous middle-aged man?

Mom Dani Grier Mulvenna shared a photo of her infant daughter Cora side by side with a photo of Woody Harrelson on Twitter, with the caption "Ok but how does our daughter look like Woody Harrelson." The resemblance truly is remarkable, and the tweet quickly racked up hundreds of thousands of likes, shares and replies.

Naturally, the jokes about Harrelson being the baby's secret father came next, but then Harrelson himself got wind of it.

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