Incredibly moving last messages from loved ones.

In every relationship we’ll ever have, there’s going to be a final conversation.

Before the digital age, these interactions were usually face-to-face or over the telephone and could only be recorded in our memories.

But now, just about every relationship leaves a digital trail of text messages, social media interactions, and voice messages. Sometimes the final communication is a heated breakup, and other times, it’s a casual interaction shortly before a person’s death.


Now, there’s a Tumblr page that collects these haunting final messages. The Last Message Received contains submissions of the last messages people received from ex-friends or ex-significant others as well as from deceased friends and relatives. Here are some of the blog’s most haunting posts.

  1. “My good friend’s dad died around Thanksgiving. Two weeks later he drank himself to death.”

via Tumblr

2. “This is the last text I got from my mom before she died of Stage IV brain cancer at the age of 53.

It left her completely paralyzed on the left side of her body, hence the typos in the texts. What she was saying was, ‘You’re missing music therapy.’ Almost as good as Good Friday church giggles.’ A few years prior to this, we went to the Good Friday service at our church. The choir was absolutely horrendous and couldn’t sing whatsoever. She and I sat there, in the most serious, somber church service of all, laughing hysterically, unable to stop for the life of us. She sent me this text while she was in hospice and I was at school.”

via Tumblr

3. “He was my best friend and my boyfriend of 7 years.

He stuck with me when I fell pregnant at 16 after I was raped. He became an actual dad to my son. He was my everything. A few months before this message, things started to change ... One night he beat me, I ended up in hospital for a few days. He begged for forgiveness, I stayed. It happened again a few days later, he was at work when I text him. I took my son and left. This is the last text I received from him. I heard last week that he’s just been sent to prison for crimes involving violence and drugs. I hope he gets the help he needs.”

via Tumblr

4. “My dad died 6 weeks later flying the plane in this picture.”

via Tumblr

5. “The last text he sent me. The next day I got a call from his daughter that he was still very much with his wife and I wasn’t the only one he was cheating on her with.”

via Tumblr

6. “She had sent me a message earlier asking me not to contact her anymore. I woke up to one last message. We’d dated for 3.5 years and when I came out as trans, the relationship fell apart. I still think about and miss her every day.”

via Tumblr

7. “I sent this to my grandpa on thanksgiving. Two days later he unexpectedly had a heart attack and passed. He was my favorite person in the world and nothing has been the same since. I refuse to delete this message.”

via Tumblr

8. “I would have fallen in love with her if distance and timing hadn’t gotten in the way. I’m ignoring her because I need to let her move on.”

via Tumblr

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