If you're tempted to move to Canada because of Trump, please read this first.

OK. First. Breathe.

Deep breath.

Deeeeeeeeep breath.


Deeper.

OK.

Look, your arm.

Photo by Eric March/Upworthy.

Your arm is still here. And your left foot.

Photo by Eric March/Upworthy.

Yep. Still attached.

Donald Trump is going to be president for the next four years. But you're still here. And that's what matters.

If you're a progressive, non-white, a woman, a moderate Republican, or simply a fan of tasteful interior decorating, you're probably asking yourself, "What now?"

For some, the answer has been obvious for months:

Canada! Photo by Monam/Pixabay.

It's hard to deny that the situation north of the border is looking pretty good right about now. Tolerance and pluralism. Universal health care. A head of government who looks good with his shirt off. It's tempting to empty the bank account, put a down payment on a cozy two-bedroom cabin in Meat Cove, and wait till this all blows over.

It's the easy answer. But it's the wrong answer.

Of course, if you're Muslim or Mexican or black or LGBT or a member of any one of the 57 bazillion groups Trump has singled out for scorn over the course of his life and campaign — this shit is scary, and I don't blame you for hightailing it out of here if you so choose.

If, however, you — like me — have the privilege of being among the paler, maler slice of the electorate likely to remain first class citizens under President Trump, put down that suitcase. Stop googling mph-to-kph conversion tables. Unstudy the participle passe.

Things might be about to get pretty dicey here in America. And we need you! For too many reasons to enumerate. But here are a few:

1. Like it or not, a Trump presidency will likely affect the whole world all at once.

We're in this. Photo by George Burns/EPA/Wikimedia Commons.

Show me the serene, wealthy, developed country with plenty of English speakers and an advanced social welfare state you plan to flee to, and I'll show you a junior partner in an economic and/or military alliance with the United States.

President Trump tries to blow up NAFTA? Canada's gonna have to deal with that. NATO starts cracking up over Trump's pay-to-play plans? Suddenly, Europe ain't looking so hot. China seizes the opportunity to get aggressive in the South Pacific? So much for Japan and Australia.

Like it or not, the highly erratic decisions Trump might make are going to affect you anywhere you go in the world. The only chance we have of limiting the damage is if someone is here to push back.

Now, more than ever, we need to stand with women, people of color, and LGBTQ folks, and let them know we're on their side.

Speaking of...

2. We have to human shield our non-white fellow citizens with our pasty bodies.

Muslim Americans, Latino Americans, black Americans, LGBTQ Americans, disabled Americans, women Americans. They're our friends, family members, and neighbors. And they don't all have a crash pad in Quebec waiting for them.

Trump has promised to deport 11 million people. Many of those people have family members who are U.S. citizens; they have lived, worked, and paid taxes here for years (or decades). Some came here when they were children. Anti-Muslim violence has risen to its highest level since 9/11. His followers — or people purporting to be his followers — burned down a black church in Mississippi just last week.

We need to do whatever we can to slow or stop the injustices from piling up. If it requires civil disobedience, we need to be here to disobey. We can't leave the burden on those who can least afford the risk.

The best use of our privilege isn't to leverage it for entry into a receptive foreign country where we can spend the next four years feeling smug and superior to our suffering compatriots. It's as a barrier between our less privileged peers and the newly empowered clique that seeks to surveil their communities, break up their families, and deny them their rights.

3. Trump will be personally sad and possibly even ineffective if we make his life hard.

Expect more goofy, baffled faces like this for the next few years. Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

Trump is lazy. For months, he campaigned by watching cable news and ranting on Twitter rather than doing the hard work of building an actual campaign. Miraculously, it worked despite his best non-efforts.

Trump is only effective when he can bully people into shutting up and doing his bidding. Lots of people have been doing this all year: Paul Ryan, John McCain, Ted Cruz, Jason Chaffetz, Chris Christie, etc., etc., etc., etc., etc. When he has to actively fight back against opponents who stand up to him, he staggers and flails.

If those of us who oppose him and everything he stands for move to Canada, leaving only those who he can cow, we might not like how this place looks when we move back in 2021.

The work of democracy doesn't end when you lose or when things get dark.

It gets harder, but it goes on.

Trump is going to be president now. It's a sad fact, but a fact nonetheless. I'm pretty devastated, and I'm really not sure what to do next. And if I, a white guy, am feeling this way, I can only imagine how the millions of women, LGBT folks, immigrants, and people of color are coping.

Leaving for a place where our values are ascendant might be what you or I want. But that's not what this country needs.

We need votes for politicians who oppose Trump's agenda. We need people to stand in the streets when he tries to deport our colleagues and friends. We need an on-point team to make sure that this weird national freakout only lasts four years.

After last night, the Trump machine is up and running at full power.

Now it's time for the American machine — of checks and balances, of free speech and a free press, and the great tradition of political protest — to answer.

Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

via 2C2K Photography / Flickr

Scientists in India have made a major medical breakthrough by producing the first "thermostable" variety of insulin that doesn't need to be refrigerated. The research was led by two scientists from the Bose Institute and the Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (IICB) and two others from the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT).

This development is fantastic news for diabetics because it will make it a lot easier for them to store this life-saving medication. The product labels from all three of America's insulin manufacturers state that insulin should be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F.

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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