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If Our Drones Are So Accurate, Why Do Their Missiles Keep Hitting Children?

Despite repeated claims from both the Bush and Obama administrations that missile attacks from unmanned drones provide a surgically precise means of eliminating suspected terrorists, U.S. drone policy has led to the deaths of at least 178 children in Pakistan and Yemen (the U.S. is officially at war with neither) as of December 2, 2012. While one hellfire missile is obviously preferable to leveling an entire block with a bombing run, one has to wonder how effective a campaign like this really is in curtailing terrorist activity. I'm going to go out on a limb here and guess that the friends and families of those 178 children are probably more sympathetic to anti-U.S. propaganda now rather than before the U.S. started dropping missiles on their loved ones. 

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Bill Gates, billionaire and founder of Microsoft, is pointing the finger at social media companies like Facebook and Twitter for spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.

In an interview with Fast Company, Gates said: "Can the social media companies be more helpful on these issues? What creativity do we have?" Sadly, the digital tools probably have been a net contributor to spreading what I consider to be crazy ideas."

According to Gates, crazy ideas aren't just limited to the internet. They are going beyond that. He doesn't see the logic behind not protecting yourself and others from coronavirus."Not wearing masks is hard to understand, because it is not that bothersome," he explained. "It is not expensive and yet some people feel it is a sign of freedom or something, despite risk of infecting people."


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