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How Some Special Volunteers Made Brad Pitt Good Looking Again

I was always really cynical about “before-and-after” pictures, until I saw these amazing photos. They’ve been lovinglyrepaired, free of charge, by volunteers at the charity CARE for Sandy. Theorganization was set up to salvage photographsthat had been submerged in the floods caused by superstorm Sandy. The team even got to touch up Brad Pittrecently, but don’t tell Angelina!

Restored by: Boris Polonsky, Florham Park, New Jersey.
A family brought a wet, super stinky clump of photographs to be restored, including this favorite snap of Brad Pitt taken back in the nineties. The photographs were so stinky that the volunteers had to wear face masks and use fans.


Restored by: Tim Barnes, Bedford, Texas.
This is a picture from Al and Terry Fabiano’s wedding day, featuring the song they first danced to as husband and wife. Their wedding album was submerged in flood water.

Restored by: Jean Thornhill, Stoke Edith, England.
The Sullivan family, from a neighborhood in Queens, N.Y., threw away their photographs after giving up hope of ever having them restored. They quickly retrieved them when they found out about CARE for Sandy.

Restored by: Boris Polonsky, Florham Park, New Jersey.
A family brought in this honeymoon picture to be restored. It’s the only remaining photograph they have of their mom.

Restored by: Dalton Portella, Montauk, New York.
The most dramatic CARE for Sandy restoration to date. The damaged photograph had to be pried out of its picture frame.









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