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How Some Special Volunteers Made Brad Pitt Good Looking Again

I was always really cynical about “before-and-after” pictures, until I saw these amazing photos. They’ve been lovinglyrepaired, free of charge, by volunteers at the charity CARE for Sandy. Theorganization was set up to salvage photographsthat had been submerged in the floods caused by superstorm Sandy. The team even got to touch up Brad Pittrecently, but don’t tell Angelina!

How Some Special Volunteers Made Brad Pitt Good Looking Again

Restored by: Boris Polonsky, Florham Park, New Jersey.
A family brought a wet, super stinky clump of photographs to be restored, including this favorite snap of Brad Pitt taken back in the nineties. The photographs were so stinky that the volunteers had to wear face masks and use fans.


Restored by: Tim Barnes, Bedford, Texas.
This is a picture from Al and Terry Fabiano’s wedding day, featuring the song they first danced to as husband and wife. Their wedding album was submerged in flood water.

Restored by: Jean Thornhill, Stoke Edith, England.
The Sullivan family, from a neighborhood in Queens, N.Y., threw away their photographs after giving up hope of ever having them restored. They quickly retrieved them when they found out about CARE for Sandy.

Restored by: Boris Polonsky, Florham Park, New Jersey.
A family brought in this honeymoon picture to be restored. It’s the only remaining photograph they have of their mom.

Restored by: Dalton Portella, Montauk, New York.
The most dramatic CARE for Sandy restoration to date. The damaged photograph had to be pried out of its picture frame.









via Google and Pexels

A Medford, Oregon sushi restaurant tried to pull a fast one on its employees but it didn't get past the U.S. Department of Labor. The agency has recovered $280,124 in back pay from Misoya Bistro that will be split among 36 employees.

Federal investigators say that for the past two years, the restaurant paid its employees an hourly "tip wage" that was "significantly lower" than what they earned in tips.

"I think employers sometimes may think that because they pay the state minimum wage which is higher than the federal minimum wage, means that they can be involved in tips," Carrie Aguilar, district director for the Wage and Hour Division – Portland office, told NBC5. "That's just not the case. Tips should always go to the employees."

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