Here's how two girls from Nepal brought attention to the inequality facing women around the world.

Students Jharana and Sirjana were tired of gender inequality, so they made a plan.

In their home country of Nepal, women are far less likely than men to be educated. While today's generation of girls is receiving at least a basic education (91% of girls attend primary school), they're still viewed as being "less than" men when it comes to looking for a career.


GIFs from She's the First.

To raise awareness of the inequality facing Nepalese women in education and career opportunities, they began recruiting classmates to participate in a 5k run for women's equality.

Both girls attend school through a scholarship from the organization She's the First.

She's the First is dedicated to making sure girls in low-income countries have access to the education they need to succeed in life, empowering them to graduate from secondary school.


Graphic from She's the First.

The organization has funded scholarships for more than 500 girls in 10 countries.

350 runners took part in the 5k, making it a runaway success (pardon the pun).

All of the participants wore signs explaining what they were running for. And of course, each runner had their own unique reason, though they shared themes of love and compassion for women who weren't able to get an education.

Their signs said things like, "I run for girls who didn't get a chance for study," "I run for my mother," and "I run for my mother because she is not educated."

Jharana and Sirjana aren't stopping — they plan to make the 5k an annual event.

I'll high five to that.

Learn more about the 5k at the She's the First website or by watching the video below.

Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

Keep Reading Show less
Screenshots via @castrowas95/Twitter

In the Pacific Northwest, orca sightings are a fairly common occurrence. Still, tourists and locals alike marvel when a pod of "sea pandas" swim by, whipping out their phones to capture some of nature's most beautiful and intelligent creatures in their natural habitat.

While orcas aren't a threat to humans, there's a reason they're called "killer whales." To their prey, which includes just about everything that swims except humans, they are terrifying apex predators who hunt in packs and will even coordinate to attack whales several times their own size.

So if you're a human alone on a little platform boat, and a sea lion that a group of orcas was eyeing for lunch jumps onto your boat, you might feel a little wary. Especially when those orcas don't just swim on by, but surround you head-on.

Watch exactly that scenario play out (language warning, if you've got wee ones you don't want f-bombed):

Keep Reading Show less