Her girlfriend at her side, Ellen Page attended the premiere of her film, 'Freeheld.'

In 2014, Academy Award nominee Ellen Page came out.

The Canadian actress gave a tearjerking eight-minute speech at Time to Thrive, a Human Rights Campaign conference for LGBTQ youth.

She told the crowd, "I suffered for years because I was scared to be out. My spirit suffered, my mental health suffered, and my relationships suffered. And I'm standing here today, with all of you, on the other side of all that pain."


Since then, Page continues to shine on and off the screen, appearing at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival on Sept. 13, 2015.

While Page is no stranger to Hollywood glitz and glamour, the appearance at the Toronto International Film Festival was especially significant.

It marked the first time the actress appeared on the red carpet with her girlfriend, Samantha Thomas.

She shared her love for Thomas, telling E! News that "walking down the carpet holding my girlfriend's hand is pretty special."

Thomas and Page at the Toronto International Film Festival. Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Page attended the festival for the premiere of her new film, "Freeheld," inspired by the real story of a lesbian couple.

Detective Lt. Laurel Hester served 25 years for the people of Ocean County, New Jersey. When she was diagnosed with terminal cancer, she hoped to transfer her earned pension to her domestic partner of six years, Stacie Andree. However, Ocean County's elected officials denied the request, and Hester ended up in the fight of her life, in more ways than one.

"It's so gratifying to be a part of this story." — Ellen Page

Hester and Andree's story was the subject of an Academy-Award-winning documentary short in 2008. The feature-length film, starring Julianne Moore as Hester and Page as Andree, premieres nationwide Oct. 2, 2015.

Page has been connected with the film for eight years (eight years!) and said she is thrilled to see it come to fruition.

“It does take a long time to finance a movie, let alone a movie that stars two women," Page told The Daily Beast. “But it's so gratifying to be a part of this story."

Page and Andree at the "Freeheld" premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival. Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

A long-time supporter of LGBTQ rights, Page serves as a proud voice for equality in Hollywood and beyond.

While filming her new television show, Page confronted Sen. Ted Cruz at the Iowa State Fair over religious freedom bills and LGBT rights.


And in a recent interview, she challenged the notion that straight actors should be considered brave for playing LGBTQ characters.

"When people are [called] brave in regards to playing LGBTQ people, that's borderline offensive," Page told Time. “I'm never going to be considered brave for playing a straight person, and nor should I be."

Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images.

Way to go, Ellen.

From the silver screen to the state fair, you are changing minds and standing up for what's right. This, right here, is the role you were born to play.

Simon & Garfunkel's song "Bridge Over Troubled Water" has been covered by more than 50 different musical artists, from Aretha Franklin to Elvis Presley to Willie Nelson. It's a timeless classic that taps into the universal struggle of feeling down and the comfort of having someone to lift us up. It's beloved for its soothing melody and cathartic lyrics, and after a year of pandemic challenges, it's perhaps more poignant now than ever.

A few years a go, American singer-songwriter Yebba Smith shared a solo a capella version of a part of "Bridge Over Troubled Water," in which she just casually sits and sings it on a bed. It's an impressive rendition on its own, highlighting Yebba's soulful, effortless voice.

But British singer Jacob Collier recently added his own layered harmony tracks to it, taking the performance to a whole other level.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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