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He Thought Coming Out Would Cost Him His Job. But The Question His Boss Asked After Was Perfect.

Acton's coming out story is an important one not just because it has a happier ending than most, but because there's one letter in LGBTQ that too often gets left out of the conversation.

Meet Acton.

What exactly does trans mean?

According to GLAAD, trans (which is short for transgender) is defined as:

"An umbrella term for people whose gender identity and/or gender expression differs from what is typically associated with the sex they were assigned at birth. People under the transgender umbrella may describe themselves using one or more of a wide variety of terms — including transgender. ... Use the descriptive term preferred by the individual. Many transgender people are prescribed hormones by their doctors to change their bodies. Some undergo surgery as well. But not all transgender people can or will take those steps, and a transgender identity is not dependent upon medical procedures."

Here's how Acton describes being trans.

How did Acton's parents respond to his coming out?

But nothing could prepare him for coming out to his boss.

Is the suspense killing you yet? OK, I don't wanna spoil it for you, so check out Acton's story below and make sure to stick around for 2:20 to see how his boss responded to him coming out. Promise you it's worth it.


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Bill Gates, billionaire and founder of Microsoft, is pointing the finger at social media companies like Facebook and Twitter for spreading misinformation about the coronavirus.

In an interview with Fast Company, Gates said: "Can the social media companies be more helpful on these issues? What creativity do we have?" Sadly, the digital tools probably have been a net contributor to spreading what I consider to be crazy ideas."

According to Gates, crazy ideas aren't just limited to the internet. They are going beyond that. He doesn't see the logic behind not protecting yourself and others from coronavirus."Not wearing masks is hard to understand, because it is not that bothersome," he explained. "It is not expensive and yet some people feel it is a sign of freedom or something, despite risk of infecting people."


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