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He lost the vote but won history with a few simple words that helped others pave the way to change.

If you haven't met Rev. William Barber, then you are in for a treat. This is not your grandma's Sunday service, that's for sure. (Or, if it is ... then you totally have one cool grandma.) Pay close attention to the words of "The Great Dissenter" at 2:01 and see if you agree.

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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People used Twitter to comfort woman who couldn't reach her 78-year-old mom after Hurricane Ian.

After Hurricane Ian plowed through Fort Myers, Florida, people began sifting through the rubble, desperately searching for family members they hadn't been able to reach. Beth Booker was one of them.

Booker's 78-year-old mother, Carole McDanel, lives in Fort Myers and didn't evacuate as she didn't think the storm would hit the beach town. But it did, and when Booker saw pictures of her mom's house underwater, she took to Twitter to try to locate her mother.

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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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