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He Got A Good Idea From The Internet, Put It On A Cardboard Sign, And Made It Real

Chris Aschmoneit, a civil engineering major at the University of Connecticut, says that after watching a few videos about cardboard signs on Upworthy, he asked himself, "why not?" and decided to join in on the trend. So, he made a sign of his own — his says: "Wanna talk? I'll listen" — sat in a tree, and waited. Sounds crazy, right? Well, read on to find out who he talks to, why he does it and, perhaps most satisfying of all, how his fellow classmates have responded.

"The basic idea behind this is for others to inspire kindness. Try to be kind to other creatures of this realm. If you see someone not having a good day, maybe go over and talk to them. You could end up making their life better by that one interaction. Try talking to people you may not normally associate with. Try to understand someone if they seem upset rather then getting upset back at them. Also understand that you are not the center of everything, look outward and see what others are going through, they might be dealing with a lot more and could use a little assistance."


"I have not gotten any spite or negative feelings from people at college, if anyone disagrees with me doing it, they don't voice it to me or anyone I know at college. I do occasionally get people to stop by and sit for a bit and I usually love our conversations. I meet so many interesting people; some are wacky, some are thoughtful, some are just outright funny. I get to have in-depth conversations with each of them; either about them, me, or random subjects. It's also nice just to have pleasant human interaction with new people."

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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via Pixabay

Happy pumpkin season.

We celebrate Thanksgiving on the fourth Thursday in November in the United States. The big focus on that day is the massive feast, football and maybe a little talk about pilgrims and Native Americans breaking bread together.

But, aside from a possible prayer at dinner, are many people focusing on the most essential part of the holiday: being thankful?

Amy Latta, a mother and craft expert, noticed the disconnect between the holiday and its meaning in 2012 so she created a new family tradition, the Thankful Pumpkin. The idea came to her after she went to a pumpkin patch with her son, Noah, who was 3 at the time.

“We need to stop and focus and be intentional about counting our blessings. To help do that in our family, we started the tradition of the Thankful Pumpkin,” she wrote on her blog. “All you need to make one is a pumpkin and a permanent marker and a heart full of gratitude.”

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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


92-year-old Norma had a strange and heartbreaking routine.

Every night around 5:30 p.m., she stood up and told the staff at her Ohio nursing home that she needed to leave. When they asked why, she said she needed to go home to take care of her mother. Her mom, of course, had long since passed away.

Behavior like Norma's is quite common for older folks suffering from Alzheimer's or other forms of dementia. Walter, another man in the same assisted living facility, demanded breakfast from the staff every night around 7:30.

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