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He Got A Good Idea From The Internet, Put It On A Cardboard Sign, And Made It Real

Chris Aschmoneit, a civil engineering major at the University of Connecticut, says that after watching a few videos about cardboard signs on Upworthy, he asked himself, "why not?" and decided to join in on the trend. So, he made a sign of his own — his says: "Wanna talk? I'll listen" — sat in a tree, and waited. Sounds crazy, right? Well, read on to find out who he talks to, why he does it and, perhaps most satisfying of all, how his fellow classmates have responded.

He Got A Good Idea From The Internet, Put It On A Cardboard Sign, And Made It Real

"The basic idea behind this is for others to inspire kindness. Try to be kind to other creatures of this realm. If you see someone not having a good day, maybe go over and talk to them. You could end up making their life better by that one interaction. Try talking to people you may not normally associate with. Try to understand someone if they seem upset rather then getting upset back at them. Also understand that you are not the center of everything, look outward and see what others are going through, they might be dealing with a lot more and could use a little assistance."


"I have not gotten any spite or negative feelings from people at college, if anyone disagrees with me doing it, they don't voice it to me or anyone I know at college. I do occasionally get people to stop by and sit for a bit and I usually love our conversations. I meet so many interesting people; some are wacky, some are thoughtful, some are just outright funny. I get to have in-depth conversations with each of them; either about them, me, or random subjects. It's also nice just to have pleasant human interaction with new people."

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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