He climbs on his desk, insults his teacher, and leaves the whole class speechless. Point made.

Sometimes we need to feel a little uncomfortable to understand something.

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We don't always know what someone is going through.

Because we don't know what's happening with others, we can sometimes make remarks that are out of place. That's OK. It happens. We just need to remember that things aren't always as they seem.


Enter humor.

This PSA makes a great point about how things appear versus how they are. It starts off funny. The teacher is annoyed with the student. Another student chimes in with a snide remark.

The student cracks a joke.

The teacher responds.

And the student makes a joke at the teacher's expense.

And for the finale: the truth.

But then it gets real. And this is what I meant when I said things aren't always as they appear. The message is strong and important.

Mental health disorders are real.

1 in 10 young people in the U.K. will deal with a mental health disorder that necessitates help from a professional. 1 in 5 teens between the ages of 13 and 18 in the U.S. experiences a mental health disorder in any given year. 1 in 4 adults in both the U.K. and the U.S. will experience a mental health issue over the course of a year.

Unfortunately, there's a stigma attached to mental health disorders. Time for Change explains:

"The attitudes people have towards those of us with mental health problems mean it is harder for them to work, make friends and in short, live a normal life.

  • People become isolated
  • They are excluded from everyday activities
  • It is harder to get or keep a job
  • People can be reluctant to seek help, which makes recovery slower and more difficult
  • Their physical health is affected

Many people say that being discriminated against in work and social situations can be a bigger burden than the illness itself."

It really is time for change. If you know someone struggling with a mental health disorder, be a source of support if you're able. If you're struggling, there's help. If you're in the U.S., visit MentalHealth.gov.

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