He climbs on his desk, insults his teacher, and leaves the whole class speechless. Point made.

Sometimes we need to feel a little uncomfortable to understand something.

<span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span><span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

We don't always know what someone is going through.

Because we don't know what's happening with others, we can sometimes make remarks that are out of place. That's OK. It happens. We just need to remember that things aren't always as they seem.


Enter humor.

This PSA makes a great point about how things appear versus how they are. It starts off funny. The teacher is annoyed with the student. Another student chimes in with a snide remark.

The student cracks a joke.

The teacher responds.

And the student makes a joke at the teacher's expense.

And for the finale: the truth.

But then it gets real. And this is what I meant when I said things aren't always as they appear. The message is strong and important.

Mental health disorders are real.

1 in 10 young people in the U.K. will deal with a mental health disorder that necessitates help from a professional. 1 in 5 teens between the ages of 13 and 18 in the U.S. experiences a mental health disorder in any given year. 1 in 4 adults in both the U.K. and the U.S. will experience a mental health issue over the course of a year.

Unfortunately, there's a stigma attached to mental health disorders. Time for Change explains:

"The attitudes people have towards those of us with mental health problems mean it is harder for them to work, make friends and in short, live a normal life.

  • People become isolated
  • They are excluded from everyday activities
  • It is harder to get or keep a job
  • People can be reluctant to seek help, which makes recovery slower and more difficult
  • Their physical health is affected

Many people say that being discriminated against in work and social situations can be a bigger burden than the illness itself."

It really is time for change. If you know someone struggling with a mental health disorder, be a source of support if you're able. If you're struggling, there's help. If you're in the U.S., visit MentalHealth.gov.

More

Comedy legend Carol Burnett once said, "Giving birth is like taking your lower lip and forcing it over your head." She wasn't joking.

Going through childbirth is widely acknowledged as one of the most grueling things a human can endure. Having birthed three babies myself, I can attest that Burnett's description is fairly accurate—if that seemingly impossible lip-stretching feat lasted for hours and involved a much more sensitive part of your body.

Keep Reading Show less
Family
BXGD / Flickr and Cody Bondarchuk / Twitter

Sometimes the smallest gesture can turn your entire day around. You find a $5 bill in the pockets of your jeans. There's no traffic on the way home from work. Or by some divine intervention, you get 11 chicken McNuggets in your 10-piece box.

Of course, if you've ever had such a blessing, you know your first thought is, "Must be some sort of mistake."

But do you return the extra McNugget? Nope. You don't even feel an ounce of guilt for it. You dunk it in barbecue sauce and relish it like a gift from the gods.

A former McDonald's employee in Edmonton, Canada let the world know that sometimes an extra McNugget is not a mistake and he's become a viral hero.

Keep Reading Show less
popular

Gerrymandering is a funny word, isn't it? Did you know that it's actually a mashup of the name "Gerry" and the word "salamander"? Apparently, in 1812, Massachusetts governor Elbridge Gerry had a new voting district drawn that seemed to favor his party. On a map, the district looked like a salamander, and a Boston paper published it with the title The GerryMander.

That tidbit of absurdity seems rather tame compared to an entire alphabet made from redrawn voting districts a century later, and yet here we are. God bless America.

Keep Reading Show less
popular
Facebook / Cierra Brittany Forney

Children in middle school can be super shallow when it comes to fashion. To be part of the in-crowd, you have to wear the right shoes and brand-name clothing, and listen to the right music.

The sad thing is that kids that age can be so creative, but they're forced into conformity by their peers.

Some people never escape this developmental phase and spend their entire lives wasting their money on material goods and judging those who do not or can not.

Keep Reading Show less
popular