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Gillian Anderson has been kicking ass and taking names for women in the entertainment industry since "The X-Files" premiered over 20 years ago.

Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images.


Ever since "The X-Files" first premiered in 1993, Anderson has been fighting to be treated as an equal to her male co-star on the series, David Duchovny.

As the Daily Beast reported:

"While Scully asserted her authority at every turn, Anderson found herself fighting just to stand on (literal) equal ground with her male co-star. The studio initially required Anderson to stand a few feet behind her male partner on camera, careful never to step side-by-side with him. And it took three years before Anderson finally closed the wage gap between her pay and Duchovny’s, having become fed up with accepting less than 'equal pay for equal work.'"

Anderson's portrayal of Scully over 20 years ago was an inspiration for a generation of women who grew up seeing themselves represented in a science-fiction show.

Kate McKinnon, star of "Saturday Night Live" and the recent "Ghostbusters" reboot, is one of those women — and even once dressed up as Scully for Halloween.

While that's amazing all on its own, it's not the most exciting news here.

Gillian Anderson just tweeted a photo of a young McKinnon dressed in full Scully regalia:

She captioned the photo:

"Kate McKinnon, we have something in common & it's not slimy green things. #Ghostbusters #thefutureisfemale"

This tweet is so many awesome things at once. Not only did Anderson honor McKinnon, the incredibly talented and deserving breakout star of "Ghostbusters," but she added the hashtag #thefutureisfemale, a slogan that originated back in 1972 to commemorate the first women's bookstore in New York City. Over the years, it's become a phrase for women's empowerment in the face of oppression.

Anderson's tweet makes an important statement about "Ghostbusters," a movie that's taken a lot of flack for putting hilarious women in the foreground. And fans have echoed her sentiment across Twitter.

Writer Jill Pantozzi shared a photo of herself also dressed as Scully:


In an article about why prominent female characters are important in movies like "Ghostbusters" and TV shows like "The X-Files," Pantozzi explained, "No matter how you feel about Ghostbusters, you can't deny these women and their characters will make a lasting and powerful impact to so many people."

Thanks to Anderson, McKinnon, and all women battling the still frightfully misogynistic world that is the entertainment business, things are slowly but surely changing for the better.

Hopefully, as a result, there will be a lot more girls dressed up like Scully and the Ghostbusters gang this Halloween.

This article originally appeared on 09.06.17


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Here are some hilarious tweets that just about every married couple will understand.

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Democracy

A man told me gun laws would create more 'soft targets.' He summed up the whole problem.

As far as I know, there are only two places in the world where people living their lives are referred to as 'soft targets.'

Photo by Taylor Wilcox on Unsplash

Only in America are kids in classrooms referred to as "soft targets."

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My family member who was at the parade was able to flee to safety, but the trauma of what she experienced will linger. For the toddler with the blood-soaked sock, carried to safety by a stranger after being pulled from under his father's bullet-torn body, life will never be the same.

There's a phrase I keep seeing in debates over gun violence, one that I can't seem to shake from my mind. After the Uvalde school shooting, I shared my thoughts on why arming teachers is a bad idea, and a gentleman responded with this brief comment:

"Way to create more soft targets."

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Paul Rudd in 2016.

Passing around your yearbook to have it signed by friends, teachers and classmates is a fun rite of passage for kids in junior high and high school. But, according to KDVR, for Brody Ridder, a bullied sixth grader at The Academy of Charter Schools in Westminster, Colorado, it was just another day of putting up with rejection.

Poor Brody was only able to get four signatures in his yearbook, two from what appeared to be teachers and one from himself that said, “Hope you make some more friends."

Brody’s mom, Cassandra Ridder has been devastated by the bullying her son has faced over the past two years. "There [are] kids that have pushed him and called him names," she told The Washington Post. It has to be terrible to have your child be bullied and there is nothing you can do.

She posted about the incident on Facebook.

“My poor son. Doesn’t seem like it’s getting any better. 2 teachers and a total of 2 students wrote in his yearbook,” she posted on Facebook. “Despite Brody asking all kinds of kids to sign it. So Brody took it upon himself to write to himself. My heart is shattered. Teach your kids kindness.”

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