Zaha Hadid, designer of some of world's most captivating, groundbreaking buildings, passed away today at age 65.

Photo by Andrew Rentz/Getty Images.


Known as the "Queen of the Curve," Hadid was born in Baghdad and lived primarily in the U.K., where she established herself as one of the most dominant, innovative British architects of the 20th and 21st centuries.

In an industry where just 12% of female British architects are partners in firms, Hadid refused to take no for an answer — and her persistence paid off. She was the first woman to win both the Pritzker Architecture Prize and the Royal Institute of British Architects Royal Gold Medal — two of the biggest architecture awards in the world.

"Among architects emerging in the last few decades, no one had any more impact than she did. She fought her way through as a woman," fellow architect Richard Rogers told The Guardian.

We all like to think that, when we die, we'll leave behind a lasting legacy. In reality, most of us are lucky to leave behind so much as a cool couch and $47.

Here's what Hadid left behind:

1. Guangzhou Opera House in Guangzhou, China

Photo by Mr a/Wikimedia Commons.

2. Bridge Pavilion in Zaragoza, Spain

Photo by Juan E De Cristofaro/Flickr.

3. Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg, Germany

Photo by Richard Bartz/Wikimedia Commons.

4. Maggie's Centres at the Victoria Hospital in Kirkcaldy, Scotland

Photo by Duncan Cumming/Wikimedia Commons.

5. MAXXI: Italian National Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome, Italy

Photo by selbst/Wikimedia Commons.

6. Bergisel Ski Jump in Innsbruck, Austria

Photo by Lindsey Nicholson/Flickr.

7. Broad Art Museum in East Lansing, Michigan, U.S.


Photo by Kremerbi/Wikimedia Commons.

8. Vitra Fire Station in Weil am Rhein, Germany

Photo by Sandstein/Wikimedia Commons.

9. Heydar Aliyev Cultural Centre in Baku, Azerbaijan

Photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images.

10. BMW Central Building in Leipzig, Germany

Photo by Grombo/Wikimedia Commons.

11. Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.

Photo by cdschock/Flickr.

12. London Aquatics Centre in London, England

Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.

13. Riverside Museum in Glasgow, Scotland

Photo by Eoin/Wikimedia Commons.

14. Galaxy SOHO in Beijing, China

Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Getty Images.

15. Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, England

Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images.

16. CMA CGM Tower in Marseille, France

Photo by Boris Horvat/Getty Images.

17. Vienna University of Economics Library and Learning Centre in Vienna, Austria

Photo by Peter Haas/Wikimedia Commons.

That's ... a legacy.

Rest in peace.

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