Famed architect Zaha Hadid has died. She left behind these 17 jaw-dropping buildings.

Zaha Hadid, designer of some of world's most captivating, groundbreaking buildings, passed away today at age 65.

Photo by Andrew Rentz/Getty Images.


Known as the "Queen of the Curve," Hadid was born in Baghdad and lived primarily in the U.K., where she established herself as one of the most dominant, innovative British architects of the 20th and 21st centuries.

In an industry where just 12% of female British architects are partners in firms, Hadid refused to take no for an answer — and her persistence paid off. She was the first woman to win both the Pritzker Architecture Prize and the Royal Institute of British Architects Royal Gold Medal — two of the biggest architecture awards in the world.

"Among architects emerging in the last few decades, no one had any more impact than she did. She fought her way through as a woman," fellow architect Richard Rogers told The Guardian.

We all like to think that, when we die, we'll leave behind a lasting legacy. In reality, most of us are lucky to leave behind so much as a cool couch and $47.

Here's what Hadid left behind:

1. Guangzhou Opera House in Guangzhou, China

Photo by Mr a/Wikimedia Commons.

2. Bridge Pavilion in Zaragoza, Spain

Photo by Juan E De Cristofaro/Flickr.

3. Phaeno Science Center in Wolfsburg, Germany

Photo by Richard Bartz/Wikimedia Commons.

4. Maggie's Centres at the Victoria Hospital in Kirkcaldy, Scotland

Photo by Duncan Cumming/Wikimedia Commons.

5. MAXXI: Italian National Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome, Italy

Photo by selbst/Wikimedia Commons.

6. Bergisel Ski Jump in Innsbruck, Austria

Photo by Lindsey Nicholson/Flickr.

7. Broad Art Museum in East Lansing, Michigan, U.S.


Photo by Kremerbi/Wikimedia Commons.

8. Vitra Fire Station in Weil am Rhein, Germany

Photo by Sandstein/Wikimedia Commons.

9. Heydar Aliyev Cultural Centre in Baku, Azerbaijan

Photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images.

10. BMW Central Building in Leipzig, Germany

Photo by Grombo/Wikimedia Commons.

11. Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.

Photo by cdschock/Flickr.

12. London Aquatics Centre in London, England

Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images.

13. Riverside Museum in Glasgow, Scotland

Photo by Eoin/Wikimedia Commons.

14. Galaxy SOHO in Beijing, China

Photo by Kim Kyung-Hoon/Getty Images.

15. Serpentine Sackler Gallery in London, England

Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images.

16. CMA CGM Tower in Marseille, France

Photo by Boris Horvat/Getty Images.

17. Vienna University of Economics Library and Learning Centre in Vienna, Austria

Photo by Peter Haas/Wikimedia Commons.

That's ... a legacy.

Rest in peace.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

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John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

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"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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