While Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court, the bravery of his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, is already having a ripple effect throughout society.

Ford’s courage to speak her truth in the face of a seemingly insurmountable tidal wave of harassment, mockery, and sexism, has empowered abuse survivors across the globe.

On September 27, after Ford’s testimony to the Senate Judiciary Committee, actress Busy Phillipps was so inspired that she came out about being raped at 14. “Today is the day we are silent no more,” she wrote on Instagram. “All of us. I’m scared to post this. I can't imagine what Dr. Ford is feeling right now.”


Phillipps told Ellen DeGeneres how she was inspired by Ford.

“I was so moved by her bravery,” Phillipps told DeGneres on a show that aired Wednesday, October 3. “It wasn’t something that I ever felt I was ever going to blast out on social media, but when I saw her standing there speaking her truth after 30 years, I was like, ‘It’s been 25 years for me, and I can do this.’”

DeGeneres was so affected by Phillipps and Ford, she felt compelled to tell her story.

“I was 15 and I had something happen to me," DeGeneres said. "When I watched Dr. Ford — anyone who has had something happen to them, you just get so angry when someone doesn’t believe you or says, ‘Why did you wait so long?’”

“It’s because we’re girls and we’re taught not to say anything and go along with it,” she continued. “So you at 14, me at 15, God knows how many people in this audience have had something happen.”

DeGeneres said victims need to feel safe enough to raise their voice.

“I think this conversation needs to happen more and people need to, first of all, teach your children to speak up, and don’t ever keep something in and don’t ever be ashamed and think that it’s your problem and your fault because it’s never your fault," she said. "You’re a child."

While Ford has faced a disgusting onslaught of abuse for coming forward, the way she has inspired others to tell their story, has already changed countless lives for the better.

A society is only as as sick as its secrets, so the more we open up about sexual abuse, the less likely future generations will suffer.

via Cosmic Toro / Instagram

There is no playbook for how to deal with someone going on a racist rant in public. But the way server Gennica Cochran handled a bigot demeaning a table of Asian customers is something we can all applaud.

She was working as a server at a Camel Valley restaurant near San Francisco when Michael Lofthouse, CEO of tech firm Solid8, began harassing an Asian family celebrating a birthday.

Lofthouse had been belligerent all night, changing his seat and repeatedly sending back food.

After going on an expletive-laden racist rant at the family for singing "Happy Birthday," Jordan Chan, pulled out his cellphone, began recording Lofthouse, asking him to, "Say that again."

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