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chris starkey, dad daughter dance, dance battle

The Starkeys' epic dance battel.

This article originally appeared on 03.25.20


As the U.S. slogs through the second week of widespread social distancing, many of us are feeling the impact of cabin fever and near-constant family togetherness. For many families, the past 10 days have felt like a combo of "Yay, more quality family time!" and "OMG, more social distance in this house, please."


We're also all looking for bright lights of joy in the midst of all the pandemic uneasiness and uncertainty and the Starkey family in Denver, Colorado has provided some of that joy this week.

Chris Starkey posted a video to Facebook on Monday of himself and his daughter Brooklyn doing a dance-off to Flo Rida's "Low"—and it's unexpectedly awesome. Starkey wrote, "My daughter challenged me to a dance off and said I don't have it anymore. See that closet in the back she is still crying in it!!!" So much silly shade thrown around in this family, it's delightful.

When you see their fun banter and Starkey's middle-aged-man moves, you'll see why the video has been shared more than 280,000 times in two days. Starkey wrote in a comment that the reaction has brought tears to his eyes and encourages everyone to "Give back to your community" right now. He also says another video will be coming on Monday.

Excellent. We need this kind of levity right now more than ever.

Chris Starkey


Albert Einstein

One of the strangest things about being human is that people of lesser intelligence tend to overestimate how smart they are and people who are highly intelligent tend to underestimate how smart they are.

This is called the Dunning-Kruger effect and it’s proven every time you log onto Facebook and see someone from high school who thinks they know more about vaccines than a doctor.

The interesting thing is that even though people are poor judges of their own smarts, we’ve evolved to be pretty good at judging the intelligence of others.

“Such findings imply that, in order to be adaptive, first impressions of personality or social characteristics should be accurate,” a study published in the journal Intelligence says. “There is accumulating evidence that this is indeed the case—at least to some extent—for traits such as intelligence extraversion, conscientiousness, openness, and narcissism, and even for characteristics such as sexual orientation, political ideology, or antigay prejudice.”

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New Texas restaurant has a strict 'no cellphones allowed' policy. Let’s hope it starts a trend.

"If you can't possibly deal without your phone for two hours, this is not the place for you.”

Chef Tim Love at Caterina's.

Pixabay In the mid-2000s people were so eager to adopt smartphone technology that we never had time to create any etiquette for using it. Now, two decades later, it’s acceptable for people to stare at their phones when others are around, even in social situations. It's also fine to take any event and turn it into little more than an excuse to create social media content.

But in 2022, the constant notifications can feel a lot more like an annoyance than a blessing. Further, these tiny interruptions take us out of the moment and prevent us from paying attention to our friends, a good meal, or a show.

Funny enough, studies show that having a cell phone in your pocket can make you feel more stressed, but when we don’t have our phone on us we experience a sense of anxiety as well. Smartphones, can't live with 'em, can't live without 'em.

Smartphones have become such an interruption that some concert venues and comedy clubs have developed a new system that locks phones in a pouch and they can be opened in case of an emergency or when the show is over.

The system is great because it prevents you from being distracted by the guy in front of you who wants to film everything and also allows you to enjoy the show instead of feeling pressured to take photos or text your friends about the show.

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A lock of hair, reputedly from King George III.

In modern times we memorialize our loved ones by saving old photographs, holding onto their jewelry, or keeping their ashes in an urn. But, according to Artsy, before we had photographs of people to remember them by, people often saved their hair.

It was impossible to save someone’s rotting flesh before modern preservation techniques were developed, plus it’s pretty disgusting. So hair was the only part of the body that one could keep. Human hair can retain its color and texture for years after someone has passed, so it's a durable material to turn into remembrance art.

“The keeping and saving of hair for future use in jewelry or other commemorative craft (such as wreaths) was common,” Karen Bachmann wrote, according to Artsy. The practice was common in Victorian England and it was brought across the pond to America’s frontier.

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