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Cristiano Ronaldo reminds us why we shouldn't be so quick to judge others.

An athlete with a reputation for 'selfish' play just made a very unselfish move.

Cristiano Ronaldo is one of the greatest soccer players in the game's storied history. And that's not really up for dispute.

Photo by David Ramos/Getty Images.


The prolific Real Madrid and Portugal scorer has racked up more than 500 goals throughout his career and holds more records than would comfortably fit in any article about him.

The man is a true talent, known for his powerful leg and outstanding footwork that makes defenders look absolutely silly.

For example:

GIF via JavierNathaniel/YouTube.

The guy's got moves, that's for sure, but he's also got a (sometimes not-so-great) reputation for being pretty "selfish."

"Selfish," "petulant," and "self-absorbed" are all words that have been used to describe the striker's play and attitude.

Who needs passing when you can do this? He's the one taking the shot. GIF via JavierNathaniel/YouTube.

Given his knack for scoring, it shouldn't come as much of a surprise that he hit the winning goal in the 2016 Champions League final.

Facing off against rival Atlético Madrid, Ronaldo clinched victory for Real Madrid when his turn came up during the decisive shootout. It's the type of goal you could watch over and over, just admiring its beauty.

GOOOAAL!

And as a Champions League winner, Ronaldo was entitled to a 600,000-euro bonus. What he did with that money might come as a shock, though: He gave it away.

It's not immediately clear where the roughly $675,000 donation went, but he reportedly instructed his agent prior to the game to donate the money on his behalf should they win.

How can someone with a reputation as being "selfish" and "self-absorbed" also be so unbelievably charitable? People are complex! Sometimes it's good not to judge a book by its meticulously coiffed cover.

Photo by Gonzalo Arroyo Moreno/Getty Images.

Ronaldo has actually been one of the sports world's top philanthropists during his career, having supported charities such as UNICEF, Save the Children, and World Vision. But people don't talk about that side of him much.

The whole thing might have you as faked out as this defender. GIF via JavierNathaniel/YouTube.

Life is full of so much more than clear-cut, black-and-white situations. Realistically, most of us live in the gray between.

Maybe this is can be a lesson for all of us in not being so quick to make snap judgments.

So congratulations on your win, Ronaldo, and good on you for making such an impressive donation!

He's the one taking the shot. GIF via JavierNathaniel/YouTube.


A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Canva

Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


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