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ALL KINDS OF WRONG: CNN Pays Touching Tribute To The Rapists Who Attacked A 16-Year-Old Girl

CNN took an interesting angle on the Stuebenville rape verdict. They focused on the convicted rapists, and their lost potential, in what I can only assume was an attempt to milk the drama for ratings. The rapists may have to do a WHOLE YEAR in prison, just because they and some of their buddies drugged and repeatedly raped a 16-year-old girl, then dumped her in a yard and urinated on her. (Had they been tried as adults, they would have gotten 5-12 years, which also isn't nearly enough, but I digress.)You'll notice how little they actually mention the victim. Sigh.

ALL KINDS OF WRONG: CNN Pays Touching Tribute To The Rapists Who Attacked A 16-Year-Old Girl


  • At 1:20, Poppy discusses the rapists' impressive resumes.
  • At 1:54, Poppy says alcohol was a factor in their decision to rape.
  • At 2:20, Poppy speaks as though they are brave for apologizing. 
  • At 3:27, Poppy tries to make us feel bad for them some more.
  • At 4:34, Candy makes a passing mention of the actual victim, then gets to the important part: asking how the conviction will make the rapists' lives harder. 
  • And at 5:18, they report that some sex offenders will have to be registered as sex offenders. Shocked, I say, shocked.

If you want something actually productive to do with your anger after watching CNN's awful coverage, then sign this petition to educate high school coaches on sexual assault, so they in turn can educate their players. And then please share this so they never report like this again.


UPDATE: I've seen a post from someone who shared this stating that one of the newscasters should see what it's like to be sexually assaulted. If you write something like that, you are part of the problem. This isn't about vengeance, this is about holding people accountable and getting them to cover these cases with more substance. Please be respectful when you comment, and do not threaten people.

via Fox 5 / YouTube

Back in February, northern Virginia was experiencing freezing temperatures, so FOX 5 DC's Bob Barnard took to the streets to get the low down. His report opens with him having fun with some Leesburg locals and trying his hand at scraping ice off their parked cars.

But at about the 1:50 mark, he was interrupted by an unaccompanied puppy running down the street towards the news crew.

The dog had a collar but there was no owner in sight.

Barnard stopped everything he was doing to pick the dog up off the freezing road to keep it safe. "Forget the people we talked to earlier, I want to get to know this dog," he told his fellow reporters back in the warm newsroom.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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