Chelsea Clinton showed everyone how to respond to Roseanne's toxic tweets.

Roseanne had quite a day on Twitter. And Chelsea Clinton knew exactly what to do about it.

Hours before Roseanne Barr's infamous tweet that got her show canceled, she was already caught up in another Twitter meltdown, sending unsolicited, hateful tweets to Chelsea Clinton.

On May 28, Barr tweeted at the former first daughter, with a jab at billionaire George Soros, a favorite target of right-wing conspiracy theorists:


Rather than lower herself to Roseanne's level, Clinton responded with simple facts and a measure of kindness her attacker frankly didn't deserve:

Hours later, Roseanne's racist tweet dominated the news. But it's worth following the Twitter trail of evidence.

By the morning of May 29, Roseanne was the biggest story on Twitter. A vile racist tweet directed at former Obama White House Adviser Valerie Jarrett left ABC little choice but to cancel Roseanne's TV show. That's obviously a huge story but if you look at Roseanne's Twitter feed over the past 24 hours, it's clear this wasn't an isolated incident.

Roseanne compared Clinton's appearance to an animal, accused her of sympathizing with Nazis, and retweeted others claiming Clinton was part of a "conspiracy" to defend Soros.

In context, Roseanne's more infamous racist tweet is less shocking than inevitable. If we weren't talking about her show getting canceled, we'd almost certainly be talking about any one of the other offensive, inaccurate, and bizarre things she's tweeted.

Hopefully Roseanne honors her promise to take a break from Twitter. We'd rather honor people like Clinton for the good things they're doing.

After apologizing for her racist tweet, Roseanne said she was leaving Twitter.

Meanwhile, if you're not a regular follower of Chelsea Clinton on Twitter, her artful handling of Roseanne's invective isn't her first rodeo when it comes to showing the world of social media a better way forward.

Despite her outspoken criticism of President Donald Trump, she was quick to defend his young son Barron when he became the target of cruel jokes online in January 2017. And after a "Saturday Night Live" writer made a joke about the then-10-year-old, Clinton quickly responded saying, "Barron Trump deserves the chance every child does — to be a kid."

Now, if more people could just act like adults, we might not need Clinton to explain the rules of decent engagement to Roseanne and others on Twitter. But in the meantime, we're glad she's there spreading a message of decency and kindness.

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Shanda Lynn Poitra was born and raised on the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. She lived there until she was 24 years old when she left for college at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.

"Unfortunately," she says, "I took my bad relationship with me. At the time, I didn't realize it was so bad, much less, abusive. Seeing and hearing about abusive relationships while growing up gave me the mentality that it was just a normal way of life."

Those college years away from home were difficult for a lot of reasons. She had three small children — two in diapers, one in elementary school — as well as a full-time University class schedule and a part-time job as a housekeeper.

"I wore many masks back then and clothing that would cover the bruises," she remembers. "Despite the darkness that I was living in, I was a great student; I knew that no matter what, I HAD to succeed. I knew there was more to my future than what I was living, so I kept working hard."

While searching for an elective class during this time, she came across a one-credit, 20-hour IMPACT self-defense class that could be done over a weekend. That single credit changed her life forever. It helped give her the confidence to leave her abusive relationship and inspired her to bring IMPACT classes to other Native women in her community.

I walked into class on a Friday thinking that I would simply learn how to handle a person trying to rob me, and I walked out on a Sunday evening with a voice so powerful that I could handle the most passive attacks to my being, along with physical attacks."

It didn't take long for her to notice the difference the class was making in her life.

"I was setting boundaries and people were either respecting them or not, but I was able to acknowledge who was worth keeping in my life and who wasn't," she says.

Following the class, she also joined a roller derby league where she met many other powerful women who inspired her — and during that summer, she found the courage to leave her abuser.

"As afraid as I was, I finally had the courage to report the abuse to legal authorities, and I had the support of friends and family who provided comfort for my children and I during this time," she says.

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One little girl took pictures of her school lunches. The Internet responded — and so did the school.

If you listened to traditional news media (and sometimes social media), you'd begin to think the Internet and technology are bad for kids. Or kids are bad for technology. Here's a fascinating alternative idea.

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Norton

This article originally appeared on 03.31.15

Kids can innovate, create, and imagine in ways that are fresh and inspiring — when we "allow" them to do so, anyway. Despite the tendency for parents to freak out because their kids are spending more and more time with technology in schools, and the tendency for schools themselves to set extremely restrictive limits on the usage of such technology, there's a solid argument for letting them be free to imagine and then make it happen.

It's not a stretch to say the kids in this video are on the cutting edge. Some of the results he talks about in the video at the bottom are quite impressive.

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