Can you do a quick thing to help nearly a million kids in Nepal survive the earthquake aftermath?

Nearly 4,000 are dead from the intense earthquake and avalanche. For many Nepalese, the fight for survival has just begun:


A family takes shelter on a sidewalk in the Kathmandu city centre.


They need warm blankets and shelter from the elements. But even more crucially, first they need clean water:

A young girl plays with a plastic bottle in an evacuation area set up by the authorities in Tundikhel park in Kathmandu.
"I think 100% of people in Kathmandu are not inside their homes."

A first-hand account courtesy of the humanitarian aid organization CARE:

Santosh Sharma, an emergency response coordinator with CARE in Nepal, said a few homes in his Kathmandu neighborhood lost walls or crumbled to the ground. Sharma rushed to help two people injured in the rubble. “Their houses completely collapsed," Sharma said. “They had bad wounds and were bleeding. We took them to the nearest health center where they got first aid."
...
Sharma said compound walls that ring homes near him collapsed into the streets, making the job of emergency responders even more difficult. And as darkness descended on the capital Saturday, families were gathered out in the streets, afraid to re-enter their homes for fear that aftershocks would send them tumbling to the ground as well.

“I think 100% of people in Kathmandu are not inside their homes," Sharma said.

“Everyone is outside with no tents or blankets. This are very difficult conditions for women, children and elderly people. It's very cold for them, and the aftershocks just keep coming for hours. Everyone is afraid to go indoors, so we will all sleep outside in the cold tonight."






A resident cries while speaking on the phone under her tent in an evacuation area in Tundikhel park.

What YOU can do right now — right this minute:

  • Give to CARE, UNICEF, or Oxfam, all good choices that use the money for a variety of first-response emergency needs.
  • Give to Habitat for Humanity International; they're preparing emergency shelter kits. According to their site, "Habitat for Humanity has worked in Nepal for 18 years and has helped tens of thousands of families in need of decent housing."
  • Get clean, potable water to the Nepalese earthquake victims posthaste through Waves for Water.

We don't usually beg people to share our posts, but in this case, we'll make an exception. Please, please, please take one of the actions above (if you can) and ask your friends to do the same.

"I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers — so many caring people in this world."

True

If you've ever donated to a cause but worried that your contribution wasn't really enough to drive real change, you're not alone. As one person, it can be tough to feel like you're making a real difference, especially if you don't have a lot to donate or if times are tough (aka there's a worldwide pandemic going on.)

That's why, for years, the idea of philanthropy felt a little bit like a rich person's thing: if you had millions, you could donate and make change. The rest of us were just tossing pennies into a cup without really doing much.

But that's a problem: the priorities of a wealthy few don't represent the priorities of many, which means that good causes are often left underfunded, leading to a lack of meaningful action.

The thing is: it doesn't have to be like this. We can all make a difference, especially if we pool our money together.

Enter: Giving Circles. These are when groups of people with shared values come together to drive change. They do it by pooling their time and money together, then deciding as a circle where it should go. That way, they can cause a real targeted change in one place quickly in a very people-powered way by giving what they can, whether that's volunteer hours, money, or a mix of both. Best of all, Giving Circles are a social experience — you get to work together as a community to make sure you do the most good you can.

In other words, giving circles are a way to democratize philanthropy, making it more accessible regardless of your age, income, gender, or race.

That's why this year, The Elevate Prize, a nonprofit founded in 2019, is launching a new pop-up "Giving Circle" program so that problem solvers, budding philanthropists, and anyone that wants to do good can come together and drive real impact at a large scale. And you can do it all in just 90 minutes.

All you have to do is join one of the Elevate Giving Circles online. Learn about organizations doing good for the world, then pool your money together, and as a group, direct it where you think that donation could make the most difference.

But that's not all: every single donation made is matched by the Elevate Prize Foundation — basically guaranteeing that you double your impact for good. The theme for the first cycle is education, and Elevate Giving will match up to $75,000 in total donations for each cycle.

Ready to get involved? Elevate Giving experiences start June 26th, so sign up now for your spot to make a difference. There's no minimum fee to join either — so get involved no matter what you have to give. Now that's philanthropy for all.

This story was originally published on The Mighty and originally appeared here on 07.21.17


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