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Beyoncé had a moment with Ed McMahon that fueled her success, but it also hit her differently later.

She worked hard and gave up a lot to get where she's at. She's not complaining, but she's taking a hard look at what's really important now. She's ready to give up the quest for perfection and replace it with a thirst for living.

The feminist author that Beyoncé discusses at 1:49, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, is nominated for a Grammy for her collaboration with Queen Bey on "Flawless."


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This is the excerpt from Adichie's essay that Beyoncé sampled and which snagged the Grammy nomination:

"We teach girls to shrink themselves,
to make themselves smaller.
We say to girls,
'You can have ambition,
but not too much.
You should aim to be successful,
but not too successful.
Otherwise you will threaten the man.
Because I am female,
I am expected to aspire to marriage.
I am expected to make my life choices
always keeping in mind that
marriage is the most important.
Now marriage can be a source of
joy and love and mutual support.
But why do we teach to aspire to marriage
and we don't teach boys the same?
We raise girls to see each other as competitors —
not for jobs or for accomplishments,
which I think can be a good thing,
but for the attention of men.
We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings
in the way that boys are.
Feminist: the person who believes in the social,
political and economic equality of the sexes."























For some people, every day is Independence Day. For Janis Shinwari, this will be his first 4th of July as an American citizen. And boy, he earned it.

"If I was in Afghanistan—if I didn't come here, I wouldn't be alive now. I would be dead." Shinwari told CNN Heroes in 2018. Shinwari risked his life for nine years serving as a translator for U.S. forces in his native country of Afghanistan. He risked his life everyday knowing that should he be caught by the Taliban, the consequences would be severe. "If the Taliban catch you, they will torture you in front of your kids and families and make a film of you." Shinwari said. "Then [they'll] send it to other translators as a warning message to stop working with the American forces."

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