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Gates Foundation

Many women and girls in India wear a small dot, called a bindi, on their foreheads.

Images by the Grey Group.


The bindi is traditionally used for religious purposes, to signify marriage, and for a number of other reasons.

But now it's being used to help save lives, thanks to the creative minds at ad agency the Grey Group and the Neelvasant Medical Foundation and Research Centre.

In India alone, 350 million people are at risk for iodine deficiency.

Iodine deficiency is the world's leading cause of brain damage. You don't hear much about iodine, but its role in the human body is incredibly important.

In pregnant women, a lack of iodine can result in cognitive birth defects or stillbirth.

While iodine deficiency is a problem around the globe, parts of rural India suffer greatly because iodized salt, the most widely used method for combatting iodine deficiency, is not readily available.

Supplements exist, but they're expensive.

Knowing this, Grey for Good, the philanthropic arm of Grey Group, developed the Life Saving Dot.

The back of each Life Saving Dot, or Jeevan Bindi, is coated in iodine, which turns it into a small iodine patch.

Over eight hours, each Jeevan Bindi delivers up to 150 micrograms of iodine through the skin.

That's 100% of the recommended amount for women!

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Best of all, a month's supply of Life Saving Dots is affordable!

30 days of dots costs 10 rupees, or 16 cents.

To get the dots where they're needed most, Grey for Good teamed up with the Neelvasant Medical Foundation and Research Centre, a non-governmental organization supporting rural and tribal populations in India.

The foundation identified groups in need and set up medical camps to deliver the innovative supplements.


So far, more than 30,000 women in over 100 villages have received these Life Saving Dots.

While it's not clear yet whether the bindis are entirely effective under every circumstance — for example, it's possible the iodine could evaporate over time when worn in extreme heat or other severe conditions — this is a huge step toward solving a serious global health crisis.

Learn more about Life Saving Dots in this short video:

Joy

Man uses TikTok to offer 'dinner with dad' to any kid that needs one, even adult ones

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud.

Come for the food, stay for the wholesomeness.

Summer Clayton is the father of 2.4 million kids and he couldn’t be more proud. His TikTok channel is dedicated to giving people intimate conversations they might long to have with their own father, but can’t. The most popular is his “Dinner With Dad” segment.

The concept is simple: Clayton, aka Dad, always sets down two plates of food. He always tells you what’s for dinner. He always blesses the food. He always checks in with how you’re doing.

I stress the stability here, because as someone who grew up with a less-than-stable relationship with their parents, it stood out immediately. I found myself breathing a sigh of relief at Clayton’s consistency. I also noticed the immediate emotional connection created just by being asked, “How was your day?” According to relationship coach and couples counselor Don Olund, these two elements—stability and connection—are fundamental cravings that children have of their parents. Perhaps we never really stop needing it from them.


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How do you explain the transition from the brown and orange aesthetic of the '70s to the dusty rose and forest green carpeting of the '80s if you didn't experience it? When I tell my kids there were smoking sections in restaurants and airplanes and ashtrays everywhere, they look horrified (and rightfully so—what were we thinking?!). The fact that we went places with our friends with no quick way to get ahold of our parents? Unbelievable.

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