An artist made a two-sided painting, strapped it to a truck, and drove it to Trump Tower.

Artist David Datuna isn't the only American who's sick of this election, but he might be the only one who's taking matters into his own hands by strapping two giant paintings to a trailer and driving them all over the country.

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The title of the piece, which has made appearances in New York City, Pennsylvania, and Washington, D.C., comes from a combination of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump's campaign slogans — and is the message Datuna hopes to send to voters: Make America Stronger Together.


"I couldn’t keep silent anymore," Datuna wrote in a statement. "My 10-year-old son is watching, the children of the world are watching and we deserve better. After this election is over we must Make America Stronger Together by coming together as one."

The truck's first stop in New York City? Trump Tower.

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Datuna also brought the piece to Trump International Hotel in Washington D.C., in addition to the National Mall.

On one side, a series of plastic hands form the letters "SOS," representing a nation in distress.

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On the other, the hands make the word "ONE," which Datuna describes as a call for unity.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Datuna, who was born in Soviet Georgia, explained in his statement that while "art and politics have always had a storied relationship," the current political climate put him in a dark place emotionally.

The sculptures were, in part, an attempt to generate hope from that darkness, by reminding Americans what they have in common.

Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

Datuna plans to continue touring and expanding the piece. On Halloween, he did just that, flying by the Statue of Liberty on a plane painted with images of Clinton and Trump.

Which raises the question:

After all we've been through this year, can a piece of art really bring us together?

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Americans seem more divided than ever. It's hard to imagine a couple of paintings and an SUV will make the difference. But Datuna is trying to find out.

And that's far better than the alternative.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.