An artist created itty-bitty paintings every day for a year. Here are 15 of them.

Teeny tiny things are totally fascinating.

Which is why Brooke Rothshank took an interest in miniatures 11 years ago after attending a doll house miniature show. Shortly after, she began creating highly detailed, fascinating itty bitty (totally not a technical term) paintings in oils and acrylics. She even received a scholarship to attend the International Guild of Miniature Artisans school.

As many couples do, Rothshank and her husband started a family and a few years ago, with a 2-year-old and a 5-year-old, she was having trouble completing any tiny drawings.


"I enjoy being with my kids and I love being a mom but making art is an integral part of living well for me," Rothshank told Upworthy.

And so with the support and help of her husband, her mom, and baby-sitters, she decided to make herself a promise.

Brooke Rothshank committed to creating one tiny painting every day for an entire year.

She was successful in her year-long endeavor and got back into the routine of making time for her passion. In fact, it went so well that she's going to commit to a weekly commissioned piece of work for the entire year in 2017.

The paintings are gorgeous and immaculate and tiny! Each one can take anywhere from half an hour to four hours to complete. The paintings are at 1/12th scale and super detailed.

So here are 15 of her amazing tiny paintings!

1. A perfect miniature unicorn.

All photos of paintings belong to Brooke Rothshank and are shared here with permission.

2. The ultimate single serving Sriracha.

3. An itty-bitty kitty cat.

4. A tiny violin.

5. A super small fish bowl.

6. A teeny baby elephant.

7. A pocket-sized goat.

8. A minuscule gummy bear.

9. A teeny turtle.

10. The smallest cheese spread ever.

11. A sweet sleeping fox.

12. A minuscule sprinkled donut.

13. A pint-sized boot.

14. Slight strawberries.

15. A teensy treat.

The paintings are fantastic, but equally important is the message Rothshank shared along with them.

"I have a personal need to create," she said. But as most parents know, it's not always easy to balance parenting young children with work and hobbies. And often, our personal interests are the first things we set aside. "[F]inding smaller ways to satisfy that need has been my solution," she said.

How does that work? For Rothshank, who gave birth to her third child seven weeks early in December, it means asking for help from family and using baby-sitters to ensure she has even small windows of time for her art.

"My advice is to make your passions a consistent priority," she said. "When you are parenting small children, devoting time to yourself each day simply for self-care can make a radical difference."

Courtesy of Verizon
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If someone were to say "video games" to you, what are the first words that come to mind? Whatever words you thought of (fun, exciting, etc.), we're willing to guess "healthy" or "mental health tool" didn't pop into your mind.

And yet… it turns out they are. Especially for Veterans.

How? Well, for one thing, video games — and virtual reality more generally — are also more accessible and less stigmatized to veterans than mental health treatment. In fact, some psychiatrists are using virtual reality systems for this reason to treat PTSD.

Secondly, video games allow people to socialize in new ways with people who share common interests and goals. And for Veterans, many of whom leave the military feeling isolated or lonely after they lose the daily camaraderie of their regiment, that socialization is critical to their mental health. It gives them a virtual group of friends to talk with, connect to, and relate to through shared goals and interests.

In addition, according to a 2018 study, since many video games simulate real-life situations they encountered during their service, it makes socialization easier since they can relate to and find common ground with other gamers while playing.

This can help ease symptoms of depression, anxiety, and even PTSD in Veterans, which affects 20% of the Veterans who have served since 9/11.

Watch here as Verizon dives into the stories of three Veteran gamers to learn how video games helped them build community, deal with trauma and have some fun.

Band of Gamers www.youtube.com

Video games have been especially beneficial to Veterans since the beginning of the pandemic when all of us — Veterans included — have been even more isolated than ever before.

And that's why Verizon launched a challenge last year, which saw $30,000 donated to four military charities.

And this year, they're going even bigger by launching a new World of Warships charity tournament in partnership with Wargaming and Wounded Warrior Project called "Verizon Warrior Series." During the tournament, gamers will be able to interact with the game's iconic ships in new and exciting ways, all while giving back.

Together with these nonprofits, the tournament will welcome teams all across the nation in order to raise money for military charities helping Veterans in need. There will be a $100,000 prize pool donated to these charities, as well as donation drives for injured Veterans at every match during the tournament to raise extra funds.

Verizon is also providing special discounts to Those Who Serve communities, including military and first responders, and they're offering a $75 in-game content military promo for World of Warships.

Tournament finals are scheduled for August 8, so be sure to tune in to the tournament and donate if you can in order to give back to Veterans in need.

Courtesy of Verizon

Ready for the weekend? Of course, you are. Here's our weekly dose of good vibes to help you shed the stresses of the workweek and put yourself in a great frame of mind.

These 10 stories made us happy this week because they feature amazing creativity, generosity, and one super-cute fish.

1. Diver befriends a fish with the cutest smile

Hawaiian underwater photographer Yuki Nakano befriended a friendly porcupine fish and now they hang out regularly.

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