More

Amy Schumer’s sketch on guns is hilarious, terrifying, and way too real.

'Just your regular, run-of-the-mill, meat and potatoes handgun!'

Amy Schumer’s sketch on guns is hilarious, terrifying, and way too real.

Are you on the lookout for the perfect gift?

GIFs from "Inside Amy Schumer."


Good news. Amy Schumer's got your back: a gun.

“Just your regular, run-of-the-mill, meat and potatoes handgun!" she explained in character as a home shopping network host on this week's episode of "Inside Amy Schumer."

"Now how cute is that?”

As Schumer's character explained, there's a good chance you can buy a gun in the U.S. — even if you don't realize it!

The sketch highlighted just how shockingly easy it is to buy a gun in America by having interested customers call in to make sure they qualified.

Do you have several felonies on your record?

What about the no-fly list? Are you on there?

Law-makers recently shot down a bill that would have banned folks on the no-fly list — including suspected terrorists — from buying guns.

Are you a parent? Well, why not buy one as a gift for someone else?

Didn't you hear? Guns were a very hot Christmas wish list item this past December.

As most things Schumer touches, the sketch is hilarious ... but also terrifyingly real.

Because yes — America has much more lenient gun laws compared to the rest of the developed world and many more homicides from guns to show for it.

Gun violence is an issue deeply personal to Schumer, so it comes as no surprise she used her comedy show to broach the topic.

After a gunman open fired during a screening of her film, "Trainwreck," last summer in a Louisiana theater — killing two people and injuring others — Schumer was motivated to take a strong position and speak up in favor of gun control.

Amy Schumer with her cousin Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY). Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images.

"These shootings have got to stop," she said during a conference in support of stricter gun measures last August. "I don't know how else to say it."

As Schumer points out in the sketch, America's lack of gun control is absurd, but it's not that surprising when you consider how much influence the gun lobby has on Washington.

"United States congressman and senators ... can be purchased for much cheaper than you think," she says in the sketch, which explains why so many common sense gun regulations — many of which the majority of gun owners support — haven't been passed.

Schumer even went so far as to feature the names of real members of Congress who've received funding from gun lobbyists at the end of the sketch.

In case you're interested, top recipients Schumer gave a shoutout to included Cory Gardner, Ted Cruz, John Cornyn, Marco Rubio, Mitch McConnell, Dean Heller, Steve Daines, Tom Cotton, Bill Cassidy, Paul Ryan, Rand Paul, David Vitter, Pat Roberts, Rob Portman, Ken Buck, Kelly Ayotte, James M. Inhofe, Joni Ernst, John Thune, Lindsey Graham, Jeff Flake, James Lankford, John Barrasso, Jody B. Hice, Deb Fischer, Mike Lee, Richard Burr, Thom Tillis, Shelley Moore Capito, Thad Cochran, Kevin McCarthy, Alexander X. Mooney, Ken Calvert, Mike Coffman, Martha McSally, Michael B. Enzi, Michael K. Simpson, Tim Scott, Roy Blunt, Ron Johnson, Edward R. Royce, Mia B. Love, Stevan Pearce, Sanford Bishop, Thomas Massie, Markwayne Mullin, Edward R. Royce, Heidi Heitkamp, Dan Benishek, John Kline, David G. Valadao, Sean P. Duffy, Tim Walberg, Scott R. Tipton, Jerry Moran, Ben Sasse, Richard C. Shelby, John Hoeven, James E. Risch, David Perdue, Mike Rounds, Roger F. Wicker, John Boozman, Chuck Grassley, Daniel Sullivan, Johnny Isakson.

If you're as fed up as Schumer is when it comes to gun violence in America, you can support Everytown for Gun Safety — an advocacy group "Inside Amy Schumer" directs viewers to at the end of the sketch.

The comedian tweeted along with fans during the episode using the hashtag #EndGunViolence.


Watch the entire "Inside Amy Schumer" sketch below:

Courtesy of Back on My Feet
True

Having graduated in the top 10% of Reserve Officer Training Corp (ROTC) cadets nationwide in 2012, Pat Robinson was ready to take on a career in the Air Force full speed ahead.

Despite her stellar performance in the classroom and training grounds, Robinson feared other habits she'd picked up at Ohio University had sent her down the wrong tracks.

First stationed near Panama City, Florida, Robinson became reliant on alcohol while serving as an air battle manager student. After barnstorming through Atlanta's nightclubs on New Year's Eve, Robinson failed a drug test and lied to her commanding officer about the results.

Eleven months later, she was dismissed. Feeling ashamed and directionless, Robinson briefly returned home to Cleveland before venturing west to look for work in San Francisco.

After a brief stint working at a paint store, Robinson found herself without a source of income and was relegated to living in her car. Robinson's garbage can soon became littered with parking tickets and her car was towed. Golden Gate Park's cool grass soon replaced her bed.

"My substance abuse spiraled very quickly," Robinson said. "You name it, I probably used it. Very quickly I contracted HIV and Hepatitis C. I was arrested again and again and was finally charged and sentenced to substance abuse treatment."

Keep Reading Show less
via Taber Andrew Bain / Flickr

The tiniest state with the longest name may soon just be the tiniest state after November 3. Rhode Island is voting on whether to change its official name from "The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations" to "The State of Rhode Island."

Lawmakers in the state would like to shorten the name because the term "plantations" has a historical connection to slavery in the United States.

This isn't the first time the state has attempted to remove "plantations" from its name. Rhode Island attempted the change ten years ago and 78% of voters opposed the idea.

Keep Reading Show less
Photo courtesy of Claudia Romo Edelman
True

When the novel coronavirus hit the United States, life as we knew it quickly changed. As many people holed up in their homes, some essential workers had to make the impossible choice of going to work or quitting their jobs— a choice they continue to make each day.

Because over 80 percent of working Hispanic adults provide essential services for the U.S. economy, the Hispanic community is disproportionately affected. Hispanic families are also much more likely to live in multigenerational households, carrying the extra risk of infecting the most vulnerable. In fact, Hispanics are 20 times more likely than other patients to test positive for COVID-19.

Claudia Romo Edelman saw a community in desperate need of guidance and support. And she created Hispanic Star, a non-profit designed to help Hispanic people in the U.S. pull together as a proud, unified group and overcome barriers — the most pressing of which is the effects of the pandemic.

Because the Hispanic community is so diverse, unification is, and was, an enormous challenge.

Photo credit: Hispanic Star

Keep Reading Show less

Electing Donald Trump to be president of the United States set an incredibly ugly example for the nation's youth.

We know how it's affected the national discourse of regular adults. But there's no denying the conduct of a president impacts how children around the world see the example being set for them. Every day for the past four years, children have been subjected to the behavior of a divisive figure that many of their parents chose to exalt to the most powerful office in the world.

Sure, adults can make excuses for him saying he's an "imperfect messenger" or that they "didn't vote for him to be reverend," but these are all just ways to rationalize voting for a man with zero character. What a message to send to children: Act awful and you'll be handsomely rewarded.

But what if you took away the "Trump" name and examined the character traits of him as an ordinary person? More specifically, what if your daughter came to you and said this was the kind of person she was planning to date? Well, one MAGA family found out and the results are funny, insightful and quite revealing about how we somehow hold our leaders to different and lower standards than we expect from ourselves in our day to day lives.

Keep Reading Show less
File:Delta Airlines - Boeing 767-300 - N185DN (Quintin Soloviev ...

Want to land yourself on a no-fly list? Refuse to wear a mask on an airplane. Delta is actually having to ban people from flights for not wearing masks. "As of this week, we've added 460 people to our no-fly list for refusing to comply with our mask requirement," Delta CEO Ed Bastian said in a message to employees per CNN. The number is up from 270 people in August. It's kinda nuts that people are so against covering their nose and mouth that they're actually willing to get kicked off an airline, but here we are.

We're a good seven months in to the pandemic, so having to wear some kind of protective covering isn't new anymore. Delta flights have been requiring face masks on flights since May 4th, and has been barring rule breakers from traveling since June. Delta is also one of two major U.S. airlines that keeps the middle seat open (at least until the end of 2020).

Keep Reading Show less