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Amber Rose and Blac Chyna confronted their critics in a big way at the VMAs using their dresses.

"I decided to wear every derogatory word you can possibly call a woman because people call us that all the time."

Amber Rose and Blac Chyna confronted their critics in a big way at the VMAs using their dresses.

Ever been insulted, made fun of, or verbally attacked by someone? I'm gonna take a wild guess and say yes. Now imagine tens of thousands of people doing that to you on a daily basis. Would you be brave enough to have a response like this?

Big Thank u to @thesepinklips and @brittanydeshields for making our Fits for the #VMAs #YoungTalent πŸ’‹
A photo posted by Amber Rose (@amberrose) on

The MTV Video Music Awards featured feuds, boobs, and everything in between. But before the show even started, two celebrities made a serious statement against slut shaming that a lot of people seem to have missed.


Amber Rose and Blac Chyna decided to strut the carpet wearing clothing covered with hateful terms that are used against women.

Call me crazy, but I think women are more than the clothes they wear, so I personally hate how people fixate on what female celebrities wear on the red carpet. But this is a rare occasion when "What are you wearing?" is an important and necessary question.

Why? Because they're words that Amber Rose and Blac Chyna β€” along with countless other women around the world β€” face every day. It's called slut shaming, and they decided to do something about it.

"I decided to wear every derogatory word you can possibly call a woman because people call us that all the time," Amber Rose explained.

In case you haven't come across the term, "slut shaming" is the practice of criticizing a woman for engaging in certain sexual behaviors whether it be actual or presumed based on her manner of dress, speech, or personality β€” and it's bad.

Slut shaming is crazy-making. Think about it:

There isn't one, young Abigail Breslin.

And that's part of the problem! Women can't express themselves sexually without being scrutinized. There's a clear double standard when Nick Jonas can grind up on multiple women on stage at the VMAs and be praised while Miley Cyrus is attacked for wearing pasties over her breasts. (Um, seriously β€” what is folks' problem with the female breast?)

Participating in slut shaming or even just allowing it to go on around you sends the message that girls and women who dress a certain way or have sex are sluts. And words have serious power. Slut shaming promotes rape culture.

The next time you hear someone use the word "slut," think about this:

Roughly 300,000 people are raped or sexually assaulted every single year in this country alone.

Rape culture β€” a society in which rape is widespread because of views on sexuality and gender β€” is bred from slurs like those that Amber Rose and Blac Chyna wore on their outfits. It's bred from a culture in which we think it's OK to shame and police women. A culture where we blame the victim of sexual violence or harassment because "she was asking for it."

So what do we do about it?

We don't all get to walk the red carpet, but that doesn't mean that we can't take a stand against slut shaming. Here are a few tips:

  1. Think before you speak. Don't contribute to the problem. Make sure you're doing your part to ensure that you aren't shaming others. Ask yourself, β€œAm I saying something that Amber Rose would put on her next red-carpet outfit?"
  2. Educate yourself. Educate yourself and others about victim-blaming and rape culture. We all have the responsibility to be informed so that we can make the best choices and encourage others to as well.
  3. Shut that ish down. If you see someone shaming others, call them out on it. Ignorance is just a lack of knowledge, so go educate some folks.

Let's start a conversation that really matters. Let's end slut shaming.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message β€” 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again β€” and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.