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All Of Your Reasons To Not Get A Flu Shot Are Horribly Wrong (Also, Really Dangerous)

A lot of people have written in to me to yell about how I am a fraud because I'm helping the CDC and Big Pharma and who knows who else because I advocate that everyone get immunized from the flu. Their arguments range from, "Never got it, never had one" to "Got it, it made me sick" to "It's just a scam to pad the pocketbooks of Big Pharma" — even though most pharmaceutical companies refuse to produce flu vaccines because they don't make them enough profit. Even if you don't catch the flu, you can still carry it. And you can make other people sick — people who, upon getting the flu, can actually DIE and stuff. The elderly, the young, and pregnant women are all more susceptible to the flu, with symptoms far worse than you're likely to have. The flu vaccine isn't about you. It's about the people AROUND YOU. So learn the facts before making a final decision.


Watch it. Share it. Then go take a shot for the team — the team being everyone you know and love in the US of A. Or if you aren't going to, at least have the decency to tell me why. (Please include peer-reviewed science links and/or be allergic to eggs.) I really want to know, because this isn't just your health we're talking about.


At :35, they point out that vaccines can't give you the flu, THOUGH THEY USED TO.

At 1:20, they explain how when you get sick right after a shot, it's not what you think.

At 1:58, they explain how flu shots are 85% effective. But, yes, you can still get the flu (though not because of the shot).

At 2:19, they explain how flu shots aren't about you, but everyone you ever go near — including babies and old people.

At 2:59, they explain that the flu will still kill some people — but not because of you getting a shot. There'd be more potentially killed if you didn't. Just sayin'.

And at 3:15, they list who really should not take the flu vaccine. In the words of my friend who REALLY can't get vaccinated, "I'm allergic to eggs so the standard flu vaccine is off-limits for me, and it pisses me off when people who could get vaccinated don't and then infect me."

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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RumorGuard by The News Literacy Project.

The 2016 election was a watershed moment when misinformation online became a serious problem and had enormous consequences. Even though social media sites have tried to slow the spread of misleading information, it doesn’t show any signs of letting up.

A NewsGuard report from 2020 found that engagement with unreliable sites between 2019 and 2020 doubled over that time period. But we don’t need studies to show that misinformation is a huge problem. The fact that COVID-19 misinformation was such a hindrance to stopping the virus and one-third of American voters believe that the 2020 election was stolen is proof enough.

What’s worse is that according to Pew Research, only 26% of American adults are able to distinguish between fact and opinion.

To help teach Americans how to discern real news from fake news, The News Literacy Project has created a new website called RumorGuard that debunks questionable news stories and teaches people how to become more news literate.

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Family

A mom describes her tween son's brain. It's a must-read for all parents.

"Sometimes I just feel really angry and I don’t know why."

This story originally appeared on 1.05.19


It started with a simple, sincere question from a mother of an 11-year-old boy.

An anonymous mother posted a question to Quora, a website where people can ask questions and other people can answer them. This mother wrote:

How do I tell my wonderful 11 year old son, (in a way that won't tear him down), that the way he has started talking to me (disrespectfully) makes me not want to be around him (I've already told him the bad attitude is unacceptable)?

It's a familiar scenario for those of us who have raised kids into the teen years. Our sweet, snuggly little kids turn into moody middle schoolers seemingly overnight, and sometimes we're left reeling trying to figure out how to handle their sensitive-yet-insensitive selves.


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