A restaurant owner left the most heartwarming note for the person who was digging through her trash.

Ashley Jiron owns a restaurant in Oklahoma. One day she noticed something odd.

From Katie DeLong, FOX 6 NOW:

“Last week, I had noticed some bags, when I had taken out the trash, were torn open and some of the food was taken out," Ashley Jiron, owner of P.B. Jams, said. “That really, it hurt me that someone had to do that."

She could have done what so many do when they come face to face with someone who is desperate — ignore it, decide it isn't her problem, and move on.


But instead, she posted this sign on the door of her restaurant.

Saw this outside of P.B. Jams today. #thatswhatlovelookslike
A photo posted by Greg King (@gregking8081) on


It's easy to forget that more than 600,000 Americans won't have a home tonight. It's maybe even easier to forget that there are over 17 million families in the U.S. who don't have enough to eat or worry about where their next meal is coming from. When politicians talk about cutting government spending, food stamps is often the first thing on their lips.

Too often, we look away from people who are experiencing great pain or need. Too often, we think they somehow deserve it. Too often we can't put ourselves in their shoes.

And that's why these four small words she included in her note...

"You're a human being."

...mean absolutely everything.

“I think we've all been in that position where we needed someone's help and we just needed someone to extend that hand. And if I can be that one person to extend that hand to another human being, then I will definitely do it," Jiron said.

Yes indeed.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less
via USO

Army Capt. Justin Meredith used the Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program to read to his son and family while deployed in the Middle East.

True

One of the biggest challenges deployed service members face is the feeling of being separated from their families, especially when they have children. It's also very stressful for children to be away from parents who are deployed for long periods of time.

For the past four years, the USO has brought deployed service members and their families closer through a wonderful program that allows them to read together. The Bob Hope Legacy Reading Program gives deployed service members the ability to choose a book, read it on camera, then send both the recording and book to their child.

Keep Reading Show less