A restaurant owner left the most heartwarming note for the person who was digging through her trash.

Ashley Jiron owns a restaurant in Oklahoma. One day she noticed something odd.

From Katie DeLong, FOX 6 NOW:

“Last week, I had noticed some bags, when I had taken out the trash, were torn open and some of the food was taken out," Ashley Jiron, owner of P.B. Jams, said. “That really, it hurt me that someone had to do that."

She could have done what so many do when they come face to face with someone who is desperate — ignore it, decide it isn't her problem, and move on.


But instead, she posted this sign on the door of her restaurant.

Saw this outside of P.B. Jams today. #thatswhatlovelookslike
A photo posted by Greg King (@gregking8081) on


It's easy to forget that more than 600,000 Americans won't have a home tonight. It's maybe even easier to forget that there are over 17 million families in the U.S. who don't have enough to eat or worry about where their next meal is coming from. When politicians talk about cutting government spending, food stamps is often the first thing on their lips.

Too often, we look away from people who are experiencing great pain or need. Too often, we think they somehow deserve it. Too often we can't put ourselves in their shoes.

And that's why these four small words she included in her note...

"You're a human being."

...mean absolutely everything.

“I think we've all been in that position where we needed someone's help and we just needed someone to extend that hand. And if I can be that one person to extend that hand to another human being, then I will definitely do it," Jiron said.

Yes indeed.

True

When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."

A young boy tried to grab the Pope's skull cap

A boy of about 10-years-old with a mental disability stole the show at Pope Francis' weekly general audience on Wednesday at the Vatican auditorium. In front of an audience of thousands the boy walked past security and onto the stage while priests delivered prayers and introductory speeches.

The boy, later identified as Paolo, Jr., greeted the pope by shaking his hand and when it was clear that he had no intention of leaving, the pontiff asked Monsignor Leonardo Sapienza, the head of protocol, to let the boy borrow his chair.

The boy's activity on the stage was clearly a breach of Vatican protocol but Pope Francis didn't seem to be bothered one bit. He looked at the child with a sense of joy and wasn't even disturbed when he repeatedly motioned that he wanted to remove his skull cap.

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