When you're a kid, nothing beats dressing up as your favorite character.

For me, it was the Tin Man from "The Wizard of Oz" (pretending to be rusted in place is surprisingly fun) or Raphael from the Ninja Turtles. For lots of kids, though, the absolute pinnacle of dress-up is getting decked out like a Disney Princess.

This one simple fact led Holly Christensen and Bree Hitchcock to a wonderful idea for those kids who really need some cheering up.


All photos by Holly Christensen and Bree Hitchcock, used with permission.

The Magic Yarn Project "creates soft and beautiful yarn wigs for little warriors who are bravely battling cancer."

That's according to the GoFundMe page set up by the two women. But, wow, is that an understatement.

These aren't just any wigs. They're wigs that make kids feel like their favorite princess, whether that's Elsa of "Frozen" fame or Ariel from "The Little Mermaid."

And they should win the award for Cutest Things Ever in an unprecedented landslide.

Holly, a former cancer nurse, first made a Rapunzel wig for a friend's daughter going through chemotherapy. Soon, everyone she knew wanted one.

And the coolest part? These wigs aren't just adorable; they're practical.

"The chemotherapy leaves their skin very tender and sensitive," Holly told ABC News.

Magic Yarn wigs are crocheted with super-soft material, with a cozy beanie underneath — a big improvement on the scratchy undersides found on most wigs.

What's not to love?

Holly and Bee are raising money for the supplies needed to make even more princess wigs, which they give away for free.

They're even trying to launch Magic Yarn as a genuine nonprofit to amplify their reach. And good thing, too — over 10,000 children under the age of 15 will be diagnosed with cancer this year.

That's a lot of brave kids who need people like Holly and Bree in their corner.

"To bring a little bit of magic into such a difficult time in their life is so rewarding," Holly says. "It's almost equally been so rewarding and magical to meet people who want to help."

Photo by CDC on Unsplash

When schools closed early in the spring, the entire country was thrown for a loop. Parents had to figure out what to do with their kids. Teachers had to figure out how to teach students at home. Kids had to figure out how to navigate a totally new routine that was being created and altered in real time.

For many families, it was a big honking mess—one that many really don't want to repeat in the fall.

But at the same time, the U.S. hasn't gotten a handle on the coronavirus pandemic. As states have begun reopening—several of them too early, according to public health officials—COVID-19 cases have risen to the point where we now have more cases per day than we did during the height of the outbreak in the spring. And yet President Trump is making a huge push to get schools to reopen fully in the fall, even threatening to possibly remove funding if they don't.

It's worth pointing out that Denmark and Norway had 10 and 11 new cases yesterday. Sweden and Germany had around 300 each. The U.S. had 55,000. (And no, that's not because we're testing thousands of times more people than those countries are.)

The president of the country's largest teacher's union had something to say about Trump's push to reopen schools. Lily Eskelsen Garcia says that schools do need to reopen, but they need to be able to reopen safely—with measures that will help keep both students and teachers from spreading the virus and making the pandemic worse. (Trump has also criticized the CDCs "very tough & expensive guidelines" for reopening schools.)

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