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When you're a kid, nothing beats dressing up as your favorite character.

For me, it was the Tin Man from "The Wizard of Oz" (pretending to be rusted in place is surprisingly fun) or Raphael from the Ninja Turtles. For lots of kids, though, the absolute pinnacle of dress-up is getting decked out like a Disney Princess.

This one simple fact led Holly Christensen and Bree Hitchcock to a wonderful idea for those kids who really need some cheering up.


All photos by Holly Christensen and Bree Hitchcock, used with permission.

The Magic Yarn Project "creates soft and beautiful yarn wigs for little warriors who are bravely battling cancer."

That's according to the GoFundMe page set up by the two women. But, wow, is that an understatement.

These aren't just any wigs. They're wigs that make kids feel like their favorite princess, whether that's Elsa of "Frozen" fame or Ariel from "The Little Mermaid."

And they should win the award for Cutest Things Ever in an unprecedented landslide.

Holly, a former cancer nurse, first made a Rapunzel wig for a friend's daughter going through chemotherapy. Soon, everyone she knew wanted one.

And the coolest part? These wigs aren't just adorable; they're practical.

"The chemotherapy leaves their skin very tender and sensitive," Holly told ABC News.

Magic Yarn wigs are crocheted with super-soft material, with a cozy beanie underneath — a big improvement on the scratchy undersides found on most wigs.

What's not to love?

Holly and Bee are raising money for the supplies needed to make even more princess wigs, which they give away for free.

They're even trying to launch Magic Yarn as a genuine nonprofit to amplify their reach. And good thing, too — over 10,000 children under the age of 15 will be diagnosed with cancer this year.

That's a lot of brave kids who need people like Holly and Bree in their corner.

"To bring a little bit of magic into such a difficult time in their life is so rewarding," Holly says. "It's almost equally been so rewarding and magical to meet people who want to help."

A breastfeeding mother's experience at Vienna's Schoenbrunn Zoo is touching people's hearts—but not without a fair amount of controversy.

Gemma Copeland shared her story on Facebook, which was then picked up by the Facebook page Boobie Babies. Photos show the mom breastfeeding her baby next to the window of the zoo's orangutan habitat, with a female orangutan sitting close to the glass, gazing at them.

"Today I got feeding support from the most unlikely of places, the most surreal moment of my life that had me in tears," Copeland wrote.

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Small actions lead to big movements.

Acts of kindness—we know they’re important not only for others, but for ourselves. They can contribute to a more positive community and help us feel more connected, happier even. But in our incessantly busy and hectic lives, performing good deeds can feel like an unattainable goal. Or perhaps we equate generosity with monetary contribution, which can feel like an impossible task depending on a person’s financial situation.

Perhaps surprisingly, the main reason people don’t offer more acts of kindness is the fear of being misunderstood. That is, at least, according to The Kindness Test—an online questionnaire about being nice to others that more than 60,000 people from 144 countries completed. It does make sense—having your good intentions be viewed as an awkward source of discomfort is not exactly fun for either party.

However, the results of The Kindness Test also indicated those fears were perhaps unfounded. The most common words people used were "happy," "grateful," "loved," "relieved" and "pleased" to describe their feelings after receiving kindness. Less than 1% of people said they felt embarrassed, according to the BBC.


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She's enjoying the big benefits of some simple life hacks.

James Clear’s landmark book “Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones” has sold more than 9 million copies worldwide. The book is incredibly popular because it has a simple message that can help everyone. We can develop habits that increase our productivity and success by making small changes to our daily routines.

"It is so easy to overestimate the importance of one defining moment and underestimate the value of making small improvements on a daily basis,” James Clear writes. “It is only when looking back 2 or 5 or 10 years later that the value of good habits and the cost of bad ones becomes strikingly apparent.”

His work proves that we don’t need to move mountains to improve ourselves, just get 1% better every day.

Most of us are reluctant to change because breaking old habits and starting new ones can be hard. However, there are a lot of incredibly easy habits we can develop that can add up to monumental changes.

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