+

A tragedy introduced Lucy McBath to the American public. But now she's working to transform that pain into progress.

McBath's 17-year-old son Jordan Davis was killed in 2012 after an argument with another man at a gas station over loud music. After her son's death, McBath became a public advocate for gun control, joining Everytown for Gun Safety and appearing at the White House with President Barack Obama in 2016 for a summit on gun violence. Later that year, she campaigned with Hillary Clinton during her presidential run.

It was only after the Parkland school shooting, however, that McBath decided to run for federal elected office herself, with gun safety as the main issue on her campaign platform.


"You've got to have people on the inside that are willing to do the work, creating the bills and initiatives, who will push the issue," she said. "You've got to have gun-sense champions on the inside."

Photo by Thos Robinson/Getty Images for VH1.

On July 24, she narrowly won the Democratic primary in Georgia's sixth district, meaning her determination to change gun policy will remain in the spotlight.

She will face Rep. Karen Handel (R) in the fall.  

The former flight attendant was the only mother and black candidate in the primary, she's a two-time breast cancer survivor, and she has a mission that’s about more than sending a message to Trump — she's trying to save lives. And she wants to do so with an commonsense agenda.

McBath isn't trying to ban guns; she's simply pushing for basic safety reforms, including implementing expanded background checks, raising the purchase eligibility age from 18 to 21, keeping guns away from domestic abusers, and limiting both stand your ground and concealed carry laws.

"While I support the 2nd Amendment rights of Georgians, we can still advocate for common sense gun violence prevention to make our communities safer," McBath wrote on her campaign website.

She has a tough road ahead, but her story could help change the national debate on guns.

Election forecasters say McBath's congressional district continues to lean Republican and that this is the same district that gave anti-Trump activists so much hope in 2017 when Jon Ossoff ran an upstart campaign against Handel that ultimately came up short.

But it would be a mistake to count McBath out.

She's spent the last six years fighting to transform her son's tragic death into tangible change. And she's not showing any signs of slowing down.

Pop Culture

Adults share things teens 'aren't ready to hear,' and it's some solid advice for all ages

'Social media is not reality and your entire life should not revolve around it.'

Photo by Sarah Brown on Unsplash

Some trends aren't even worth experimenting with.

No one who has ever lived to see old age has also thwarted growing older. But with age comes the gift of wisdom, along with maybe a wrinkle or too.

However, passing along that hard-earned knowledge isn’t always easy. After all, when we’re younger, the world seems to be much more simple. We are not yet fully aware that things never stop changing—trends that were once the “it” things will eventually become a source of embarrassment. Or worse … come back as “retro” or “nostalgic.” Ouch.

That’s right, kids. Believe it or not, there will come a time when even Billie Eilish isn’t cool anymore!

Of course, we’re not just talking about fashion or taste in music. Hopefully, we all expand our world view after our teenage years, growing more mature, grounded and less self-absorbed. That’s not always the case, of course, but that is the goal.

Reddit user u/Slight_Weight asked folks to share things that teens today “are not ready to hear.” Honestly I expected to find cynical, snarky “kids today don’t know anything” type of comments. But on the contrary, a lot of it really was tough love. And truthfully, much of the advice isn’t age-specific. They’re just good “be a kind human” reminders all around. And then other answers were just plain funny.

Check out 17 of the best answers. For the youngsters, just trust us on this. And for the … um … more refined crowd, you’ll probably relate to them all.
Keep ReadingShow less

Doctor in India runs 45 minutes to hospital.

Usually when someone has to go into the hospital for surgery, they expect their surgeon to be on time and in place for their procedure. There's very little thought that goes into how the doctor's morning is going or what obstacles they faced to make it to your bedside. Dr. Govind Nandakumar from Bengaluru, India, was having a bit of a rough start due to increased traffic from bad weather. But the doctor didn't let standstill traffic stop him from going to work. Nandakumar hopped out of his car and ran to get to the operating room on time.

Keep ReadingShow less

"The Carol Burnett Show" had one of the funniest outtakes in TV history.

"The Carol Burnett Show" ran from 1967 to 1978 and has been touted as one of the best television series of all time. The cast and guest stars of the show included comedic greats such as Tim Conway, Betty White, Steve Martin, Vicki Lawrence, Dick Van Dyke, Lyle Waggoner, Harvey Korman and others who went on to have long, successful comedy careers.

One firm rule Carol Burnett had on her show was that the actors stay in character. She felt it was especially important not to break character during the "Family" scenes, in which the characters Ed and Eunice Higgins (a married couple) and Mama (Eunice's mother) would play host to various colorful characters in their home.

"I never wanted to stop and do a retake, because I like our show to be ‘live,’" she wrote in her memoir, as reported by Showbiz Cheat Sheet. "So when the ‘Family’ sketches came along, I was adamant that we never break up in those scenes, because Eunice, Ed, and Mama were, in an odd way, sacred to me. They were real people in real situations, some of which were as sad and pitiful as they were funny, and I didn’t want any of us to break the fourth wall and be out of character.”

It was a noble goal, and one that went right out the window—with Burnett leading the way—in a "Family" sketch during the show's final season that ended with the entire cast rolling with laughter.

Keep ReadingShow less