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A Girl On Facebook Said, 'Black Lives Matter? All Lives Matter!' So This Woman Responded.

Next time you see someone use the hashtag #AllLivesMatter, you'll know what to say.

A Girl On Facebook Said, 'Black Lives Matter? All Lives Matter!' So This Woman Responded.

The movement behind the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter started a couple of years ago.

Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi created the hashtag around the time George Zimmerman was being acquitted for the death of Trayvon Martin.


Some people disliked the hashtag and responded with #AllLivesMatter.

No matter the intention of #AllLivesMatter, the hashtag is still a problem.

Yes, all lives do matter — or *should* matter. The sad reality is that not all lives are treated equally or treated as though they matter, as slam poet Sarah O'Neal lays out perfectly.

Racial discrimination happens in the U.S. That is a fact. And it is strongly correlated with heavy policing of black communities. That policing has often ended in the deaths of black lives. But even when black lives are lost...

You've got to ask — when so many unarmed black people have died and their killers have been acquitted, why do so many people get angry when there are protests?

Eric Garner was killed after being placed in a chokehold for allegedly having untaxed cigarettes, and we heard his last words on video.

Michael Brown's dead body was left on the street for four hours after he died. He was shot at least six times.

These are just two of the many black people who have died by police violence whose killers have walked free.

When protestors point out the injustice of this through demonstrations, why do so many people scoff at their reactions? Why do we prioritize our mild annoyance at traffic jams over black lives?

"How many more must there be for you to finally call this a genocide?"

Listen to Sarah O'Neal explain it poetically.

Fact-check time!

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

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Woman screams at a TikTokker she accused of stealing a car.

Guilherme Peruca turned on his camera's phone and started recording after an elderly woman began screaming at him through his passenger side window in a Lowe's parking lot. The woman was accusing him of stealing her friend's car, but she was mistaken.

"I need help!" the woman yells outside of his passenger side window. "Someone's trying to steal my best friend's car."

When Peruca told the woman the car was his she yelled back, "Get outta here" as she tried to pry open the door.

"He's stealing this car, it's not his!" the woman continued. "I don't care what he says!"

Eventually, a Lowe's employee intervened to sort out the situation. Peruca showed her his driver's license and car registration to prove the vehicle was his and then the employee calmly guided the woman away.

Peruca didn't need to show her his paperwork but he did so anyway just to deescalate the situation.

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When a pet is admitted to a shelter it can be a traumatizing experience. Many are afraid of their new surroundings and are far from comfortable showing off their unique personalities. The problem is that's when many of them have their photos taken to appear in online searches.

Chewy, the pet retailer who has dedicated themselves to supporting shelters and rescues throughout the country, recognized the important work of a couple in Tampa, FL who have been taking professional photos of shelter pets to help get them adopted.

"If it's a photo of a scared animal, most people, subconsciously or even consciously, are going to skip over it," pet photographer Adam Goldberg says. "They can't visualize that dog in their home."

Adam realized the importance of quality shelter photos while working as a social media specialist for the Humane Society of Broward County in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

"The photos were taken top-down so you couldn't see the size of the pet, and the flash would create these red eyes," he recalls. "Sometimes [volunteers] would shoot the photos through the chain-link fences."

That's why Adam and his wife, Mary, have spent much of their free time over the past five years photographing over 1,200 shelter animals to show off their unique personalities to potential adoptive families. The Goldbergs' wonderful work was recently profiled by Chewy in the video above entitled, "A Day in the Life of a Shelter Pet Photographer."