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A Genius Piece Of Art Forces Drone Pilots To See Who's Down Below

After learning that predator drone operators often refer to kills as "bug splats," because bodies look so small from up above, an artist collective didn't get angry — they got creative.

A Genius Piece Of Art Forces Drone Pilots To See Who's Down Below

Disposable bugs, huh?


Obviously the drone operators need to take a closer look.

From their site: An artist collective installed this massive portrait facing up in the heavily bombed Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region of Pakistan, where drone attacks regularly occur. Now, when viewed by a drone camera, what an operator sees on his screen is not an anonymous dot on the landscape, but an innocent child victim’s face.

After talking with a member of the collective, this was like the icing on the cake: "The piece was left there for as long as people decided to use the fabric for roofing and other useful purposes. The art was always meant to be utilized and not discarded after it was photographed."

via @Todd_Spence / Twitter

Seven years ago, Bill Murray shared a powerful story about the importance of art. The revelation came during a discussion at the National Gallery in London for the release of 2014's "The Monuments Men." The film is about a troop of soldiers on a mission to recover art stolen by the Nazis.

After his first time performing on stage in Chicago, Murray was so upset with himself that he contemplated taking his own life.

"I wasn't very good, and I remember my first experience, I was so bad I just walked out — out onto the street and just started walking," he said.

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