+
More

A Famous NHL Goalie Put A Bullet In His Head, And He Wants Everyone To Know Why

Trigger warning: graphic description of a suicide attempt.When you're paid to be tough and are idolized by millions, it's hard to admit when things don't feel right. Now he's helping other people speak out.

Here's Clint Malarchuk — former NHL goalie, cowboy, macho guy, and all-around hero. He also survived the most gruesome injury in NHL history,when his throat was accidentally slashed by a skate on live TV.


Not only did he NOT get counseling, he was back on the ice 10 days later. It was part of his "I'm a tough guy, I don't need help" attitude.

What was behind the mask that most people didn't know about? Clint was suffering from depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress. One day on his ranch, he took a gun and put a bullet in his head. He survived.

When Clint woke up from a coma, he was determined to use his fame to help other people. He finally opened up about his mental health issues, hoping to help break down the stigma.

He wrote a book called "The Crazy Game." In it, he says that struggling with mental illness was way more painful than having his throat slashed. Clint opens up about the pain and his path to getting help.

Clint says that many people with mental health issues don't speak up from fear of being judged but that it can change as society's attitude changes. He points out that if someone had cancer, they'd likely tell their boss, yet they hide mental illness even though it's an ailment as well.

He compares "getting depressed from a lack of serotonin" with "getting diabetes from a lack of insulin," stating they're both chemical imbalances. So why does the person with depression have more stigma attached?

Mental illness is not a weakness. In fact, Clint realized the toughest thing he ever did ... was to allow himself to talk about it.

Here's the full interview. (Warning: The throat-slashing skate injury appears from 0:14 to 0:27.)

I don't watch hockey, but I know a brave person when I see one.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

Most historians have credited the Greeks with creating the study of triangles' sides and angles, but this tablet presents indisputable evidence that the Babylonians were using the technique 1,500 years before the Greeks ever were.


Keep ReadingShow less

This article originally appeared on 08.05.21


Six years ago, a high school student named Christopher Justice eloquently explained the multiple problems with flying the Confederate flag. A video clip of Justice's truth bomb has made the viral rounds a few times since then, and here it is once again getting the attention it deserves.

Justice doesn't just explain why the flag is seen as a symbol of racism. He also explains the history of when the flag originated and why flying a Confederate flag makes no sense for people who claim to be loyal Americans.

But that clip, as great as it is, is a small part of the whole story. Knowing how the discussion came about and seeing the full debate in context is even more impressive.

Keep ReadingShow less