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A fake letter from Superman about the very real struggle we all face when we love someone.

If Superman had the heart of a poet, I imagine he'd write like this. This may get nerdy, but if you stick around to the video toward the bottom, you'll see something really awesome, I promise.

A fake letter from Superman about the very real struggle we all face when we love someone.

When you think of Superman, what comes to mind?

For me, this image is burrowed in my head.


Classy hero, am I right?

He's brave. He's humble. He's patient. He's noble. He's helpful. He's basically a perfect hero.

He reminds us of our potential.

He gives us hope.

And what is his biggest weakness?

Arbitrary plot device of doom! Via "Superman: The Movie."

No. It's not kryptonite. That's too easy.

Kryptonite is basically a lazy way for writers to find a way to make him look like he has a chance to lose. There's nothing special about it. None of us gets magically weakened by rocks.

His weakness is far more human than some green rock.

That's not why we relate to him. No, his weakness is far more substantive.

In "Superman: The Movie," he lost his temper.

So, Mr. Perfect isn't as calm as we thought. Via Giphy.

Why? Because Lois Lane died. He let his emotions get the best of him. He spun the earth backward on it's axis to reverse time he was so angry. He cheated death for selfish reasons.

In "Superman III," he gets really depressed and goes on a drinking binge.

Superman can fly but can't handle his liquor? Via Giphy.

Why? The pressure of humans relying on him got to be too much. He didn't want to disappoint them. So, he did what any human would do and wallowed in self-pity for a while. And then, he acted out. Like many of us would. (Don't ever watch this movie. You'll thank me later.)

What if you had to choose between saving the world and saving the person you love?

When it comes time to choose, Superman is just like the rest of us. Imagine if Superman didn't bottle all that up. Imagine if he shared his vulnerability and said what he really felt. It'd probably sound like this:


Heart. Punch.

Hurts, right? Via Tumblr.

It's his humanity that is his greatest weakness.

But, you know what?

It is also his greatest strength.

Shane Koyczan, the amazing poet behind this and other really powerful poems, had this to say about the poem on his YouTube page (emphasis mine):

"I grew up in the era where Clark Kent still couldn't tell Lois Lane how he felt about her. I liked that era. I liked that I could find an equality in our inability to tell those we love how deeply we feel for them ... it made me feel that I was somehow on par with Superman... I liked the idea that Clark Kent might be scared of rejection...

I have no delusions about being anyone's Superman ... it's always terrifying to put your heart out there... There's never any guarantee that your heart will be accepted ... let alone returned in working order, but I'll risk the hurt for the right person and I'm hoping I've found her.


Pictured here: You being unafraid of rejection. The guy in black is your fear of rejection. It's a cheap metaphor, I know, but I spent all my metaphor money trying to convince my wife to like me. It paid off. Via Giphy.

Don't let rejection be your kryptonite. Grab your courage and say something.

Everyone has been, or will be, in that same position at some point. Risk the hurt. Find them.

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Temwa Mzumara knows firsthand what it feels like to watch helplessly as a loved one fights to stay alive. In fact, experiencing that level of fear and vulnerability is what inspired her to become a nurse anesthetist. She wanted to be involved in the process of not only keeping critically ill people alive, but offering them peace in the midst of the unknown.

"I want to, in the minutes before taking the patient into surgery, develop a trusting and therapeutic relationship and help instill hope," said Mzumara. Especially now, with Covid restrictions, loved ones are unable to be at the side of a patient heading to surgery which makes the ability to understand and quiet her patients' fears such an important part of what she does.

Temwa | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Dedicated to making a difference in the lives of her patients, Nurse Mzumara is one of the four nurses featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series by CeraVe® that honors nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to their patients and communities.

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Nicole Abate, a Registered Medical-Surgical Nurse living in New Mexico, starts her workday around 5:00 a.m. During her 20-minute drive to work, she gets to watch the sun rise over the Sandia Mountains as she sips her coffee.

"It's one of my favorite things to do," said Nurse Abate. "A lot of us need a little calm before the storm."

Nicole | Heroes Behind the Masks Presented by CeraVe youtu.be

In March 2020, after a fairly quiet start to the year, Nurse Abate's unit became the official COVID unit for her hospital. "It went full force after that," she says. Abate was afraid, overwhelmed with uncertainty, never knowing what was next on the wild roller coaster in this new territory, "just when you think ...we know exactly what we're doing, boom, something else hits so you adapt… that's part of nursing too." Abate faced her responsibilities courageously and with grace, as she always does, making life a little better for patients and their families "Thank you for taking care of my father," reads one recent letter from a patient's family. "You were kind, attentive and strong and we are truly grateful."

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