A dad took photos of his daughter as history-making women, and they are incredible.

What better way to learn about important women in history than with beautiful photos starring an adorable 5-year-old girl?

Photographer Marc Bushelle, who's also the proud father of his subject, Lily, created this photo series, called "The Heroines Project," because he both wanted to spend quality family time with his wife and daughter and teach his daughter about strong heroines in history.

"I thought this also could be a great way to build her confidence and sense of self worth," Bushelle told Upworthy. "This series was inspired by another photographer who did something similar with her daughter."


In addition to viewing his work on his website above, be sure to like his Facebook page. You don't want to miss this kind of talent!

Bushelle's wife, Janine Harper, wrote each photo description below.

Here's Lily as smart and strong leader Admiral Michelle J. Howard.

Photo of Admiral Michelle J. Howard in the public domain. Second image by Marc Bushelle/Marc Bushelle Photography.

"On July 1, 2014, Michelle J. Howard made history by becoming the first female four-star admiral in the U.S. Navy and the highest-ranking black woman in the military. She was referenced in the Tom Hanks movie 'Captain Phillips' because Admiral Howard played a role in rescuing the actual Captain Phillips from Somali pirates. She was raised in a military family in Aurora, Colorado. In 1982, Howard graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy. She earned a master's degree from Army's Command and General Staff College in 1998. Her current ranking was not the first time she made history. She was the first black woman to take command of a U.S. Navy warship in 1999, the USS Rushmore. Never shying from a challenge, Howard has vowed to make tackling sexual assault within the Navy an important issue to allow others to achieve their goals."

Here's Lily making history as Mae Jemison.

Photo of Mae Jemison in the public domain. Second image by Marc Bushelle/Marc Bushelle Photography.

"Dr. Mae Jemison was the first African-American woman to be accepted to NASA's astronaut training program. She was also the first to go into outer space aboard the Endeavor in 1992. She was a Peace Corps volunteer and was working as a doctor when she was inspired by Sally Ride to change careers."

Lily is ready to fly the skies as Bessie Coleman.

Photo of Bessie Coleman in the public domain. Second image by Marc Bushelle/Marc Bushelle Photography.

"Bessie Coleman was the first African-American to hold an international pilot license and the first African-American woman to pilot a plane in the U.S. Unable to become a pilot in the U.S., she studied French and went to Europe. When she returned, she became a sensation for her ability to do barrel rolls, wing walks, and loop-de-loop trick aviation."

These photos are inspirational and educational all in one!

When Bushelle and his wife started the photo project, they intended it for their daughter and family. However, once they realized how much of an impact the photos were having, they decided to share them.

"It really is something special when someone tells you how much this series has touched them and that their daughters and sons are being inspired, learning and envisioning them self as trailblazers too," Bushelle told Upworthy.

"Another great thing that has come from the series so far is that the same thing seems to be happening with adults too. The best thing in the world is being able to grow and learn with your kids."

The photos also reflect the importance of empowering young children through art.

"One of my favorite parts is connecting with my daughter and watching her glow when she embodies these heroines," Bushelle said. "I love when she talks about them and is so excited about what they have accomplished and compares herself to them."

But perhaps most touching of all?

Bushelle shared something with me that he hadn't yet told anyone: "I want my daughter to be proud of me. When I am not here anymore, I want her to be able to look back at these images and remember this time, smile and keep being the trailblazer that I know she will be. She is my heroine."

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

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