A 6-year-old with cancer just saved an entire hockey team with her super-powered adorableness.

When Andrew Ference, captain of the Edmonton Oilers hockey team, was kidnapped on Sept. 28, 2015, the mayor turned to the only hero he could trust to save the day: SPIDER-MABLE (aka 6-year-old Mable Tooke)!

You have captured our hearts, #SpiderMable. Go drop that puck and enjoy your standing O! #Oilers @childrenswishfoundation #yeg
A photo posted by Ryan Jespersen (@ryanjespersen) on

Not-so-spoiler alert: This whole rescue was organized and staged by the C3:Caring Characters Cosplay and the Children's Wish Foundation of Canada to bring some much-needed brightness into the life of Mable Tooke of Edmonton, who was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia back in 2013. Her wish? To be a superhero for a day — specifically Spider-Man, whose stories she'd consume during long stays at the hospital. Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming!

Cue the chorus:


Spider-Mable, Spider-Mable
This six-year-old girl is able
To save her hockey team in time,
drop the puck when they're off-sides.
“Let's go!"so shouted Spider-Mable.




Tonigh
t's first star, obviously! 🌟 #SpiderMable #Oilers #OilCountry #ChildrensWish

A photo posted by Edmonton Oilers (@edmontonoilers) on

She really did drop the ceremonial first puck at the Oilers game. And according to her mother, when she first heard the "news" of Ference's disappearance, she really did say something as action-movie-awesome as "Let's go!"

Is she strong? Listen, bud:
The secret's right there in her blood.
Town got crime? She's your answer:
She'll battle that, like she's battled cancer.
Hey, there! There goes the Spider-Mable.




I LOVE my hometown. So much heart. So much sense of community. #yeg #spidermable #proud #inspired
A photo posted by Jen 💞 (@photo.jenic) on

Mable says she was drawn to Spider-Man because they both share radioactive blood. Not to mention the way they both always seem find the strength to smile through and endure even the darkest of moments. "He's just like me," she told CBC News. "He's funny. He's got a pretty good sense of humour."

In the chill of Canada,
at the scene of a [staged] crime,
Thanks to some fine folks,
She arrived just in time.



We are all cheering for you SpiderMable!! Please help us save Andrew Ference!! #SpiderMable #spiderman #YEG #eps #edmontonpoliceservice #edmonton #childrenswishfoundation #cancer #cancersucks #leukemia #community #support #saveus #superheroes #supervillians #edmontonoilers #andrewference #kidnapped
A photo posted by Jessi Keith (@therainbowtits) on


Mable even had the chance to practice her webslinging skills when she ziplined through the West Edmonton Mall with her hero behind her. Unless ... maybe all the film crews and stunt coordinators were actually just a part of supervillain Mysterio's diabolical special-effects scheme?

Spider-Mable, Spider-Mable
tired, wide-eyed Spider-Mable.
Childhood's been hard for her —
but we know that she'll endure.


After a two-year battle, Mable is nearing the end of her cancer treatment — and the prognosis is looking good. Her mom says the super-adventure went a long way to boost Mable's tired spirits. "She's getting close to the end of her treatment. It's become such an incredible drag," her mother, Lisa, told the Edmonton Sun. "We haven't found anything that intimidates her yet," added her father, Neil, saying that the experience helped his heroic daughter to "forget about the hospital, forget about procedures, and just be a kid again."

To her, life is a great big bang up,
but her costume, she won't hang up.
Best hopes to Spider-Mable!

If you're so inclined, you can make a donation to Children's Wish as well. But for now, we're hopeful that Spider-Mable will continue on her road to recovery and help save the citizens of Canada for many years to come. In the meantime, here's a video replaying the entire day's event:

Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

via idiehlpare / Flickr and ESPN

An innocent tweet by sports reporter Marcel Louis-Jacques erupted into a great discussion where people tried to describe the indescribable. "There's an unnamed media member in here who has never had a Dr. Pepper and asked what it tastes like," he tweeted.

"I have no idea how to describe it -- how would y'all do it?" he asked.

Marcel Louis-Jacques covers the Miami Dolphins for ESPN and appears on NFL Live, SportsCenter, ESPN Radio, and more.

The question feels like a Zen koan such as "What is the sound of one hand clapping?" or "What do you call the world?"

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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