More

8 hit songs with hidden meanings that should never be played again

I love it when people get real and call something out for what it really is.

8 hit songs with hidden meanings that should never be played again
<span class="redactor-invisible-space"> </span> <span class="redactor-invisible-space"> </span> <span class="redactor-invisible-space"></span>

Here are the eight songs they mention by name:

Some of the misogyny is hidden between verses or disguised as jokes, flirtation, or sexuality. Other times, it's unapologetically blatant.

1. "Blurred Lines" by Robin Thicke and Pharrell: As if the title and lyrics weren't bad enough, Robin Thicke went on to say how it was a pleasure to degrade women. Here's how some real rape survivors responded to his song.


2. "You Don't Even Know It" by Rick Ross: Lyrics to this song include: "I put molly [ecstasy] all in her Champagne / she ain't even know it / I took her home and enjoyed that / she ain't even know it." Ross' glorification of rape got him dropped by Reebok. He later made a statement with an apology ... sort of.

3. "The Wrong Way" by Sublime: One of Sublime's hit songs is about a 12-year-old girl sold for sex by her dad and brother. Even though the song is kinda self-aware and the narrator expresses pity for her, he still rationalizes what he does by saying that he's "only a man."

4. "Blame It on the Alcohol" by Jamie Foxx: I think Jamie Foxx can only blame himself for lyrics like: "Just one more round and you're down, I know it / Couple more shots you open up like a book." That's not consent. That's rape. In fact, studies show that rapists deliberately use alcohol as a tool to choose their victims.

5. "Baby, It's Cold Outside," written by Frank Loesser: This song is supposed to be cute, but it's really about coercing a woman into having sex. It's so bad, there's a parody sketch on it. Several, in fact.

6. Tyler the Creator: I can't limit this to just one song because his themes in general are about raping, killing, and mutilating women. Why is this allowed?

7. "Steal My Kisses" by Ben Harper: In the song, Harper sings, "I always have to steal my kisses from you / You wouldn't even come around to see me / And since you're headin' up to Carolina / You know I'm gonna be right there behind you." Note to songwriters: Stalking is not romantic. (That goes for you too, Sting.)

8. "Summer Nights" by Grease: It's all summer fun until the Greasers ask Danny, "Did she put up a fight?" It's beyond awkward — it's against the law.

When our music idols make light of sexual violence, it starts to become normalized. And that's dangerous:


Why are these kinds of songs so dangerous?

If a song like "Blurred Lines" is a #1 hit, what does that say to a rape victim? It says we, as a society, are not taking rape seriously. So how is a rape victim supposed to trust a system that's part of this rape culture? They often don't.

It's like the two poets say at the end of the video:

"We tell victims to trust a system that puts them on mute. But the system is part of the same rape culture whose songs 'blur the lines,' drowning victims' voices in the white noise of the radio ... and we all just. Can't. Stop. Singing. Along."

When we listen to these songs and dismiss them as harmless, we give power to these artists. We need to stop singing along and help change the tune by refusing to support artists who perpetuate and profit from rape culture.

True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


Sir David Attenborough has one of the most recognized and beloved voices in the world. The British broadcaster and nature historian has spent most of his 94 years on Earth educating humanity about the wonders of the natural world, inspiring multiple generations to care about the planet we all call home.

And now, Attenborough has made a new name for himself. Not only has he joined the cool kids on Instagram, he's broken the record for reaching a million followers in the shortest period. It only took four hours and 44 minutes, which is less time than it took Jennifer Aniston, who held the title before him at 5 hours and 16 minutes.

A day later, Attenborough is sitting at a whopping 3.4 million followers. And he only has two Instagram posts so far, both of them videos. But just watch his first one and you'll see why he's attracted so many fans.

Keep Reading Show less
True

$200 billion of COVID-19 recovery funding is being used to bail out fossil fuel companies. These mayors are combatting this and instead investing in green jobs and a just recovery.

Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


There are very few people who have had quite as memorable a life as Arnold Schwarzenegger. His adult life has played out in four acts, with each one arguably more consequential than the last.

And now Schwarzenegger wants to play a role in helping America, his adopted home, ensure that our 2020 election is safe, secure and available to everyone willing and able to vote.

Shortly after immigrating to America, Schwarzenegger rose up to become the most famous bodybuilder in history, turning what was largely a sideshow attraction into a legitimate sport. He then pivoted to an acting career, becoming Hollywood's highest paid star in a run that spanned three decades.


Keep Reading Show less

One night in 2018, Sheila and Steve Albers took their two youngest sons out to dinner. Their 17-year-old son, John, was in a crabby mood—not an uncommon occurrence for the teen who struggled with mental health issues—so he stayed home.

A half hour later, Sheila's started getting text messages that John wasn't safe. He had posted messages with suicidal ideations on social media and his friends had called the police to check on him. The Albers immediately raced home.

When they got there, they were met with a surreal scene. Their minivan was in the neighbor's yard across the street. John had been shot in the driver's seat six times by a police officer who had arrived to check on him. The officer had fired two shots as the teen slowly backed the van out of the garage, then 11 more after the van spun around backward. But all the officers told the Albers was that John had "passed" and had been shot. They wouldn't find out until the next day who had shot and killed him.

Keep Reading Show less