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8 Glimpses Into How We Spend Our First 70 Minutes In The World

It's just the first hour and 10 minutes of a whole lifetime, but it's action-packed.

Brand-new babies have a lot to figure out, and there are some common themes in how we all begin to take on the world. Although timing varied widely, in a study of 28 brand-spankin'-new infants, most of them indulged in the following orienteering during their first 70 minutes.

Minute 0: Babies wail a robust, angry birth cry that helps wake up the lungs.


Minute 2: After all that wailing, babies spendless than a minute relaxing, holding perfectly still on their mothers’ chests. (The researchers speculate that this silent, still break might have evolved to keepbabies hidden from predators.)

Minute 2.5: As they start to wake up, newbornsopen their eyes for the first time. Babies gradually start moving their headsand mouths.

Minute 8: Babies become even more active,keeping their eyes open for five minutes or longer at a time. During thisactive phase, newborns seem to grow interested in eating, looking at theirmothers’ faces and breasts, making sweet little “hungry” noises and movingtheir hands toward their mouths.

Minute 18: That was exhausting. Time for anotherrest.

Minute 36: Recharged newborns really kick itinto high gear and begin scooting toward their mothers’ breasts, relyingheavily on a sense of smell to navigate.

Minute 62: Babies nurse, most likely gettingsmall amounts of colostrum, a pre-milk substance packed withprotein and immunity molecules. This early suckling stimulates the breasts tomake milk and also helps mom’s uterus contract back to its pre-pregnancy size.

Minute 70: Phew, mission accomplished. Babies fall asleep for awell-deserved break.

It's a small study, but it's just the kind of careful observation of newborns we need to develop more "baby-friendly" practices that encourage breastfeeding and support newborns as they, literally, start making their own way in the world.

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Shkoryah Carthen has spent half of her life working in the service industry. While the 32-year old restaurant worker quickly sensed that Covid-19 would bring real change to her daily life, Carthen hardly knew just how strongly it would impact her livelihood.

"The biggest challenge for me during this time, honestly is just to stay afloat," Carthen said.

Upon learning the Dallas restaurant she worked for would close indefinitely, Carthen feared its doors may never reopen.

Soon after, Carthen learned that The Wilkinson Center was desperately looking for workers to create and distribute meals for those in need in their community. The next day, Carthen was at the food pantry restocking shelves and creating relief boxes filled with essentials like canned foods, baby formula and cleaning products. In addition to feeding families throughout the area, this work ensured Carthen the opportunity to provide food for her own.

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Over 500,000 people have died.

Cities and countries instituted strict lockdowns or issued shelter-in-place orders, but as we retreated indoors to flatten the curve, economies ground to a halt. Millions of people have lost their jobs. Hospital ICUs hit capacity. Inequality has been made painfully obvious as the most marginalized communities are forced to bear the worst impacts. Never before has it been more clear just how interconnected our health and the health of the planet truly is.

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Get Shift Done
True

Shkoryah Carthen has spent half of her life working in the service industry. While the 32-year old restaurant worker quickly sensed that Covid-19 would bring real change to her daily life, Carthen hardly knew just how strongly it would impact her livelihood.

"The biggest challenge for me during this time, honestly is just to stay afloat," Carthen said.

Upon learning the Dallas restaurant she worked for would close indefinitely, Carthen feared its doors may never reopen.

Soon after, Carthen learned that The Wilkinson Center was desperately looking for workers to create and distribute meals for those in need in their community. The next day, Carthen was at the food pantry restocking shelves and creating relief boxes filled with essentials like canned foods, baby formula and cleaning products. In addition to feeding families throughout the area, this work ensured Carthen the opportunity to provide food for her own.

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