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Gates Foundation

Vaccines work.

Endless scientific research has shown that vaccines do an excellent job of controlling and even eradicating diseases. They prevent about 2.5 million deaths per year and save a lot of money that would otherwise be spent on health care costs.

Yet some schools in the United States have lower vaccination rates than some developing countries.

That's not good. As we've seen over the past year, we're vulnerable to measles outbreaks in the U.S. Whereas in some countries, mothers know that a vaccine is the difference between life and death for her children and will walk great distances for the opportunity to vaccinate their kids.


Maybe we just need to understand vaccines better.

Here are eight facts about vaccines. They're worth a quick read.

If you'd like to keep vaccine-preventable diseases under control, maybe this is worth a share!

This week, a Supreme Court ruling has acknowledged that, at least for the sake of federal criminal prosecutions, most of the eastern half of Oklahoma belongs to the Muscogee (Creek) Indian Tribe. The ruling enforces treaties made in the 19th century, despite objections from state and federal governments, and upholds the sovereignty of the Muscogee to prosecute crimes committed by tribe members within their own lands.

The U.S. government has a long and storied history of breaking treaties with Native American tribes, and Indigenous communities have suffered greatly because of those broken promises.

Stacy Leeds, a former Cherokee Nation Supreme Court justice and former special district court judge for the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, described the ruling in an article on Slate:

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