70 members of Star Trek's cast and crew just wrote an epic anti-Trump letter.

Donald Trump's controversial candidacy for president is meeting resistance in unusual places.

People and organizations around the world have been speaking out publicly against him — including the Arizona Republic, which broke a 126-year tradition of endorsing Republicans, and USA Today, which broke a 34-year tradition of not endorsing any candidate.

Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.


Trump is openly and unapologetically misogynistic, racist, and intolerant. He wants to build a physical wall on the Mexican border, he wants to deport Muslims, he's joked about the assassination of Hillary Clinton, and he once made fun of a disabled reporter. And that's just a list of his greatest hits.

The latest group to speak out against The Donald is a coalition of over 70 writers, actors, directors, and producers spanning across 50 years of the "Star Trek" franchise.

In an unapologetically frank open letter, published to a Facebook page called Trek Against Trump, "Star Trek" actors, directors, producers, and crew members expressed their political stance that Donald Trump represents the opposite of everything "Star Trek" stands for and should not be allowed anywhere near the presidency.

Star Trek has always offered a positive vision of the future, a vision of hope and optimism, and most importantly, a...

Posted by Trek Against Trump on Thursday, September 29, 2016

"We cannot turn our backs on what is happening in the upcoming election," the letter reads. "Never has there been a presidential candidate who stands in such complete opposition to the ideals of the Star Trek universe as Donald Trump."

The letter was signed by J.J. Abrams (director of the 2009 "Star Trek" reboot), Scott Bakula (the captain from "Star Trek: Enterprise"), Eugene "Rod" Roddenberry (son of "Star Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry), many members of the late Leonard Nimoy's family, and many more.

Above all, Trek Against Trump urges people to get out and vote this November — and to make sure your vote actually counts:

"The resolution of conflicts on Star Trek was never easy. Don’t remain aloof –vote! We have heard people say they will vote Green or Libertarian or not at all because the two major candidates are equally flawed. That is both illogical and inaccurate. Either Secretary Clinton or Mr. Trump will occupy the White House. One is an amateur with a contemptuous ignorance of national laws and international realities, while the other has devoted her life to public service, and has deep and valuable experience with the proven ability to work with Congress to pass desperately needed legislation. If, as some say, the government is broken, a protest vote will not fix it."

The letter includes a link to Rock the Vote, a nonprofit organization that helps people register.

While "Star Trek" hasn't always been overtly political, it's a franchise that was built on a philosophy of humanism, inclusiveness, equality, and an idealistic vision for a peaceful future.

Trek Against Trump is not wrong about Trump's political views being in direct opposition to the values of "Star Trek."

GIF via "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan."

Whether on TV or movie screens, "Star Trek" has always valued diversity, multiculturalism and tolerance — the opposite of walls, deportations, and hateful rhetoric. This is a show that featured the first interracial kiss on television and counted Martin Luther King Jr. among its fans. In fact, the entire basis of Vulcan philosophy is "Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations" (abbreviated as IDIC).

"Star Trek" takes place in a society without greed or the idolization of wealth.  

"We’ve overcome hunger and greed, and we’re no longer interested in the accumulation of things," Capt. Jean Luc Picard says on "Star Trek: The Next Generation."

In contrast, Donald Trump, announced his candidacy for president in a rambling speech that included the phrase, "I'm really rich!"

GIF via "Star Trek: The Next Generation."

When you're standing in the way of the values of "Star Trek," you're probably standing in the wrong place.  

The fact is, "Star Trek" has spent 50 years painting a beautiful vision of a future without hate, greed, or intolerance.

As Bryan Fuller, who is spearheading the new "Star Trek" TV series "Star Trek: Discovery," tweeted with his endorsement of #TrekNotTrump, if we ever want to live in the future that "Trek" creator Gene Roddenberry envisioned, electing Donald Trump is not the way to get us there.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
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Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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via The Walt Disney Company / Flickr

One of the ways to tell if you're in a healthy relationship is whether you and your partner are free to talk about other people you find attractive. For many couples, bringing up such a sensitive topic can cause some major jealousy.

Of course, there's a healthy way to approach such a potentially dangerous topic.

Telling your partner you find someone else attractive shouldn't be about making them feel jealous. It's probably also best that if you're attracted to a coworker, friend, or their sibling, that you keep it to yourself.

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Courtesy of CeraVe
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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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